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Ben Pfeiffer

Ben Pfeiffer - Editor

Kansas City

Interviews Editor at The Rumpus. Writing in Paris Review Daily, Brooklyn Rail, and Kansas City Star. Represented by Ayesha Pande Literary.

Overview

I'm the Interviews Editor at The Rumpus, and the former Editorial Services Supervisor at a scholarly publishing house. I've worked in the past in marketing as a copywriter, too. I have two master's degrees in Writing (MFA ’12) and English (MA ’09). My undergraduate degree is in scriptwriting, film editing, cinematography, and web and interactive design (BS ’06). A full curriculum vitae is available to clients upon request.

My specialties are fiction and longform narrative nonfiction of any length or genre. I offer copy and developmental editing services at rates in line with those suggested by the Editorial Freelancers Association (EFA). I'm a teacher with nine years' experience at the university level and a freelance writer myself; my book-length literary projects are represented by Ayesha Pande Literary in New York City. I also make beautiful WordPress-powered websites for authors (see screenshots below).

Services
Languages
English (US)
Fiction
Adventure Anthologies Children's Picture Books Classics Crime & Mystery Fantasy Historical Fiction Horror Humor & Comedy Inspirational Literature Science Fiction Themes & Motifs Thriller Young Adult & Teen

Certifications

  • MFA in Writing and Fiction (2012)
  • MA in English (2009)

Work experience

Interviews Editor

The Rumpus

April, 2015 – Present (over 1 year)

• Manage Interviews Section for The Rumpus Online Magazine (Circulation: 800,000 unique pageviews / month).
• Correspond with contributors, edit all manuscripts, and conduct interviews as needed (see publications).
• Hired a new assistant interviews editor from a large pool of candidates spread across the world.

Asst. Interviews Editor

The Rumpus

August, 2014 – April, 2015 (8 months)

• Started as Assistant Interviews Editor and was promoted to Interviews Editor in April 2015.

Co-Founder and Co-Editor, Previously Managing Editor

Beecher's Magazine

September, 2010 – June, 2012 (over 1 year)

• Co-Founder and Co-Editor June 2011 – June 2012. Managing Editor September 2010 – June 2011.
• Solicited original fiction and nonfiction for Beecher’s Second Issue, and presided over the issue’s development.
• Managed the finances for the magazine, including the revenue generated from contest submissions
• Charged with building an infrastructure for the new, graduate student-run literary journal at the KU-MFA, including: setting up a financial structure; building a website, www.beechersmag.com

Creative Writing and Composition Instructor

University of Kansas, Missouri State University, Park University

August, 2007 – May, 2015 (almost 8 years)

• At Park: English 106: Research and Writing: Freshman Composition II See “Qualifications to Teach”
• At KU: Total of 10 sections taught to date See “Qualifications to Teach”
• At Missouri State: Taught 2 sections of Freshman Composition & 2 sections of Short Story Composition; Total of 8 sections taught 2007 – 2009; Served as guest editor of The Moon City Review; Asked to serve on a committee to revamp The Moon City Review Summer 2008

COURSES TAUGHT & QUALIFICATIONS TO TEACH

Graduate Certificate in Creative and Life Writing (EN516, EN525)
The Graduate Certificate in Creative and Life Writing, housed in the Department of English and Modern Languages within the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, is a one-year program for prose writers. The certificate program is designed to engage students in the methods and challenges of producing creative prose of publishable quality. Students take most classes in their chosen focus area—fiction or creative nonfiction—but complete common core courses at the beginning and end of the program.

English 516: Creating Fiction (Graduate Workshop)
This studio course—modeled on graduate fiction workshops such as those made popular by the Iowa Workshop—presents a craft-based approach to the structure, development and technique of fictional narratives. The primary texts in the course are student manuscripts, and a premium is placed on revision and peer/instructor evaluation.

English 525: Writing for Publication (Graduate Course)
This course is an investigation of the requirements and best practices of literary publication. The course will present students with the various methods of publication available to creative writers, and address particular trends and conventions of the publishing industry. The course culminates in the development of a publication portfolio.

English 351: Introduction to Short Story Writing
English 351 is an introduction to the conventions of short story writing. Students become familiar with terms, themes, techniques, and forms. Students engage in mindfulness and awareness, practice their skills with language, and, once familiar with the basic concepts, compose one short story totaling 5,000 words. Students also read essays and short stories assigned at the instructor’s discretion. Each student should pass the course with a solid grasp of the narrative craft. In this course, students spend each week writing fiction using prompts from The 3 A.M. Epiphany and discussing fiction theory from Francine Prose’s Reading Like a Writer. Each week, students write one 500-word assignment by choosing from among the available prompts selected by the instructor; over the weekend the students develop their stories into a longer 1,500-word narrative. Each discussion and set of prompts centers on a certain aspect of fiction. These range from the basic character, plot, setting, dialogue to the intermediate voice, implied author, verisimilitude. The class will workshop writing from the previous week during the following week, and students will receive substantial feedback from the instructor and from their peers.

English 215: Introduction to Short Story Writing
Similar to English 351 at KU, English 215 at Missouri State is an introduction to the conventions of short story writing. Students will become familiar with terms, themes, techniques, and forms. Students will engage in mindfulness and awareness, practice their skills with language, and, once familiar with the basic concepts, compose two short stories totaling 5,000 words. Students will also be required to read essays and short stories assigned at the instructor’s discretion. Each student should pass the course with a solid grasp of the narrative craft.

English 101 & 110: Freshman Composition
Both English 101 and 110 are Freshman Composition courses. In particular, English 110 focuses on critical reading and writing skills beyond the college community; it emphasizes the composition processes, argumentation of diverse issues, and collaborative learning such as peer workshops. During the semester, students write six major writing assignments representing a variety of genres of academic writing. As a part of these writing assignments they also practice revision by completing multiple drafts of each major assignment. In addition to the major writing assignments, students complete additional short writing assignments and exercises; participate in large and small group discussions, mini-lessons, and exercises; read texts representing several disciplines; attend and participate in peer writing workshops; and research using the library and internet.

English 102 & 106: Composition II, Research & Writing
English 102 and 106 are both Freshman Composition II, which I taught at KU and Park University, respectively. Their objectives are as follows: Maintain and continue to improve the abilities gained in Freshman Composition, and use writing and reading for inquiry, thinking, learning, and communicating. Work with demanding readings and learn to interpret, incorporate and evaluate these readings. Use writing as a problem-solving process that fosters the discovery, analysis, and synthesis of new ideas. Analyze and synthesize multiple points of view so as to understand that multiple perspectives of an issue are in operation at the same time. Engage in collaborative work at a variety of levels research, inventions, writing, etc. to prepare students for team/group situations, communication in the workplace, and lifelong learning. Recognize differences including differences of strategies for conveying information, for researching information, and for evaluating and analyzing information in academic rhetorical situations and respond appropriately to those differences. Recognize and critically evaluate how language choices reflect and represent multiple perspectives ideological, social, cultural, political, economic, historical. Analyze what audiences’ expectations about conventions are and address them in critical ways. Engage in a variety of research methods to study and explore topics. Propose, plan, and undertake research projects that involve a number of writing activities, including possibilities such as fieldwork as well as library and Internet research. Effectively integrate a variety of sources into their writings. Learn and use at least one system of documentation responsibly.

Freelance Writer

Self-Employed

May, 2006 – Present (over 10 years)

SELECTED PUBLICATIONS

“Early Failures: The American Invasion of Siberia.” Sadie Stein, Editor. The Paris Review Daily.
“Trickster in the Sea of Stories: Telegraph Avenue by Michael Chabon.” S. Paul, Ed. The Kansas City Star.
“The Rumpus Interview with Erik Larson.” B. Pfeiffer, Interviewer, & M. Tanner, Editor. The Rumpus.
“The Rumpus Interview with Richard Russo.” B. Pfeiffer, Interviewer, & M. Tanner, Editor. The Rumpus.
“The Rumpus Interview with Jacinda Townsend.” B. Pfeiffer, Interviewer, & M. Tanner, Editor. The Rumpus.
“The Rumpus Interview with Richard Ford.” B. Pfeiffer, Interviewer, & M. Tanner, Editor. The Rumpus.
“The Rumpus Interview with Will Chancellor.” B. Pfeiffer, Interviewer, & M. Tanner, Editor. The Rumpus.
“A Review of Eula Biss’ On Immunity.” J. Salvatore, Editor. The Brooklyn Rail.
“Sharp and Dark: A Review of Kurt Vonnegut’s Letters.” S. Paul, Ed. The Kansas City Star.
“The Latino Writers Collective.” S. Paul, Ed. The Kansas City Star.
“The Star’s 100 Best Books of the Year.” S. Paul, Ed. The Kansas City Star.
“MFA vs NYC by Chad Harbach.” B. Hurley, Editor. The Rumpus.
“The Blazing World by Siri Hustvedt.” B. Hurley, Editor The Rumpus.
“A Review of Jonathan Franzen’s Farther Away.” R. Otto, Editor. The Rumpus.
“A Review of The Rainbow Troops by Andrea Hirata.” R. Otto, Editor. The Rumpus.
“A Review of The Watery Part of the World by Michael Parker.” R. Otto, Editor The Rumpus.
“A Review of Wise Men, by Stuart Nadler.” R. Otto, Editor The Rumpus.
“A Review of Hope: A Tragedy by Shalom Auslander.” R. Otto, Editor The Rumpus.
“An Interview with Adam Wilson.” B. Pfeiffer, Interviewer, & J. Salvatore, Editor. The Brooklyn Rail.
“Technoir At Lightspeed: Warren Ellis’s Gun Machine.” J. Salvatore, Editor. The Brooklyn Rail.
“A Review of Albert of Adelaide.” L. Thomas, Editor. Fiction Writers Review.
“A Review of Battleborn by Claire Vaye Watkins.” L. Thomas, Editor Fiction Writers Review.
“Let There Be Light: The TFT Review of The Luminist.” L. Michel, Editor. The Faster Times.
“The TFT Review of Deborah Baker’s The Convert.” L. Michel, Editor. The Faster Times.
Books, Evolving. G. Holman, Ed. 417 Magazine, p. 184.
“Girls of Steele.” G. Holman, Ed. 417 Magazine, pp. 134 - 136.
“Gemstone.” Short story. G. DuBois, Ed. Flyway: Journal of Writing and the Environment.
“The Lexicon of the Sword.” Short story. J. Hoogestraat & Danielle Evans, Ed., The Moon City Review 2009.
“When the Heavens are Bright.” Short story. In M. Cafagña Ed., Moon City Review 2011.

Portfolio (2 selected works)

Harvesting All Night

Jane Hoogestraat

A chapbook of poems.

A chapbook of poems.

Some of the Words Are Theirs: A Memoir of an Alcoholic Family

George H. Jensen Jr.

Some of the Words Are Theirs is far more than the tale of an adult child of an alcoholic. Jensen’s story chronicles how he came to widen the lens through which he saw his past, removing the filters of the victim and abandoned child, allowing him to see events as significant primarily in the meaning we choose to give them.

Some of the Words Are Theirs is far more than the tale of an adult child of an alcoholic. Jensen’s story chronicles how he came to widen the lens through which he saw his past, removing the filters of the victim and abandoned child, allowing him to see events as significant primarily in the meaning we choose to give them.

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