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Christen Thompson

Christen Thompson - Editor

Charleston, SC, United States

Dedicated and passionate editor at independent publisher. Edits fiction, nonfiction across creative and analytical genres.

Overview

Hello! I am an editor, designer and part time bookseller currently living in Charleston. I am a graduate of the Denver Publishing Institute and studied fiction at Agnes Scott College. My nonfiction writing has been published in Americana Magazine and Creative Loafing Atlanta and in college I was a finalist for a statewide writers' contest in fiction. As an editor, I have acquired and edited award-winning books that have been featured in the Texas Book Festival, Louisiana Book Festival, SXSW Interactive, Austin Chronicle, USA Today, and scores of local news outlets. Most recently, a book I acquired and edited (New Orleans Boom and Blackout:100 Days in America's Coolest Hotspot by Bryan Boyles) was selected as 2015's citywide read for OneBook New Orleans. I also own a pop-up bookstore called Itinerant Literate Books.

My portfolio lists just some of the books I've worked on. In total I've worked on over 100 unique titles.

Services
Fiction
Children's - Middle Grade Crime & Mystery Historical Fiction Humor & Comedy Literature Short Story Thriller Women's Fiction Young Adult & Teen
Non-Fiction
Biographies & Memoirs History Publishing Travel Weddings

Work experience

Marketing Director

AUTHORS.me

April, 2016 – Present (8 months)

Owner

Itinerant Literate Books

January, 2015 – Present (almost 2 years)

Senior Acquisitions Editor

The History Press

July, 2014 – April, 2016 (over 1 year)

Acquisitions Editor

The History Press

August, 2012 – April, 2016 (over 3 years)

Portfolio (32 selected works)

Austin Beer: Capital City History on Tap

BitchBeer.org

Austin might be known for its live music, but its beer scene is just as vibrant and historic. As early as 1860, German immigrant Johann Schneider started brewing beer out of a saloon on Congress Avenue, later crafting innovative brew vaults, the first of their kind in the city. Proving that Austin taste buds were thirsty for something more dynamic than a Lonestar, the end of the twentieth cent... read more

Austin might be known for its live music, but its beer scene is just as vibrant and historic. As early as 1860, German immigrant Johann Schneider started brewing beer out of a saloon on Congress Avenue, later crafting innovative brew vaults, the first of their kind in the city. Proving that Austin taste buds were thirsty for something more dynamic than a Lonestar, the end of the twentieth cent... read more

New Orleans Style

Andi Eaton

After more than three hundred years, New Orleans style is not just sartorial but also venerable. A melting pot of cultures gives rise to the diverse fashion influences of French sophistication, Spanish exuberance and deep Creole roots. Classic trends like jazz style, the ebullient irreverence of Mardi Gras’ festive fashion and seersucker’s cool lines are quintessentially New Orleans. The local... read more

After more than three hundred years, New Orleans style is not just sartorial but also venerable. A melting pot of cultures gives rise to the diverse fashion influences of French sophistication, Spanish exuberance and deep Creole roots. Classic trends like jazz style, the ebullient irreverence of Mardi Gras’ festive fashion and seersucker’s cool lines are quintessentially New Orleans. The local... read more

Painting the Town Orange: The Stories Behind Houston'S Visionary Art Environments

Pete Gershon

Houston’s sprawl has come with controversy, but it has created a blank canvas for the public art community. It all started in the Telephone Road Place subdivision, where retired mail carrier Jefferson Davis McKissack built the Orange Show, an extraordinary and eccentric monument to self-reliance, hard work and, yes, the fruit itself. McKissack’s installation spawned more of its kind in the Bay... read more

Houston’s sprawl has come with controversy, but it has created a blank canvas for the public art community. It all started in the Telephone Road Place subdivision, where retired mail carrier Jefferson Davis McKissack built the Orange Show, an extraordinary and eccentric monument to self-reliance, hard work and, yes, the fruit itself. McKissack’s installation spawned more of its kind in the Bay... read more

Austin Breakfast Tacos: The Story of the Most Important Taco of the Day

Mando Rayo, Jarod Neece

Fresh tortillas, fluffy huevos con bacon and spicy salsa—good morning, Austin. Or good afternoon, evening, night—whenever! From taco tailgates to taquerias, there is a taco for every occasion and persuasion. Some say that it was born in the days of cowboys and vaqueros, and others say it was a creation of the Tex-Mex culture, but one thing is certain: the breakfast taco has taken over the Capi... read more

Fresh tortillas, fluffy huevos con bacon and spicy salsa—good morning, Austin. Or good afternoon, evening, night—whenever! From taco tailgates to taquerias, there is a taco for every occasion and persuasion. Some say that it was born in the days of cowboys and vaqueros, and others say it was a creation of the Tex-Mex culture, but one thing is certain: the breakfast taco has taken over the Capi... read more

Daughter of the White River: Depression-Era Treachery and Vengeance In the Arkansas Delta

Denise White Parkinson

The once-thriving houseboat communities along Arkansas’ White River are long gone, and few remember the sensational murder story that set local darling Helen Spence on a tragic path. In 1931, Spence shocked Arkansas when she avenged her father’s murder in a DeWitt courtroom. The state soon discovered that no prison could hold her. For the first time, prison records are unveiled to provide an e... read more

The once-thriving houseboat communities along Arkansas’ White River are long gone, and few remember the sensational murder story that set local darling Helen Spence on a tragic path. In 1931, Spence shocked Arkansas when she avenged her father’s murder in a DeWitt courtroom. The state soon discovered that no prison could hold her. For the first time, prison records are unveiled to provide an e... read more

The 1910 Slocum Massacre: An Act of Genocide In East Texas

E.R. Bills

In late July 1910, a shocking number of African Americans in Texas were slaughtered by white mobs in the Slocum area of Anderson County and the Percilla-Augusta region of neighboring Houston County. The number of dead surpassed the casualties of the Rosewood Massacre in Florida and rivaled those of the Tulsa Riots in Oklahoma, but the incident—one of the largest mass murders of blacks in Ameri... read more

In late July 1910, a shocking number of African Americans in Texas were slaughtered by white mobs in the Slocum area of Anderson County and the Percilla-Augusta region of neighboring Houston County. The number of dead surpassed the casualties of the Rosewood Massacre in Florida and rivaled those of the Tulsa Riots in Oklahoma, but the incident—one of the largest mass murders of blacks in Ameri... read more

When Hurricane Katrina Hit Home

Gail Langer Karwoski

Chazz Cohen lives with his grandmom in the Garden District of New Orleans. In his family, money is no problem. But money won't buy Chazz what he wants--a "real" home with his mom. Across town in the Ninth Ward, Lyric Talbert wishes her mom didn't expect so much from her, especially when her little brother gets sick. It seemed like the storm would blow over as so many had. But Katrina burst the... read more

Chazz Cohen lives with his grandmom in the Garden District of New Orleans. In his family, money is no problem. But money won't buy Chazz what he wants--a "real" home with his mom. Across town in the Ninth Ward, Lyric Talbert wishes her mom didn't expect so much from her, especially when her little brother gets sick. It seemed like the storm would blow over as so many had. But Katrina burst the... read more

A Guide to the Historic French Quarter

Andy Peter Antippas

Walking through the French Quarter can overwhelm the senses—and the imagination. The experience is much more meaningful with knowledge of the area’s colorful history. For instance, the infamous 1890 “separate but equal” legal doctrine justifying racial segregation was upheld by the Louisiana Supreme Court at the Cabildo on Jackson Square. In the mid-twentieth century, a young Lee Harvey Oswald... read more

Walking through the French Quarter can overwhelm the senses—and the imagination. The experience is much more meaningful with knowledge of the area’s colorful history. For instance, the infamous 1890 “separate but equal” legal doctrine justifying racial segregation was upheld by the Louisiana Supreme Court at the Cabildo on Jackson Square. In the mid-twentieth century, a young Lee Harvey Oswald... read more

The Houstorian Dictionary

James Glassman

Houston is an innovative city informed by a diverse and eclectic past that is ever-present in its customs, expressions and dreams, even though most Houstonians don't realize it. Represented by landmarks, dishes and events, the culture of America's fourth-largest city is celebrated in the literature, movies, songs and memorable quotations credited to its vibrant citizenry. The Houstorian Dictio... read more

Houston is an innovative city informed by a diverse and eclectic past that is ever-present in its customs, expressions and dreams, even though most Houstonians don't realize it. Represented by landmarks, dishes and events, the culture of America's fourth-largest city is celebrated in the literature, movies, songs and memorable quotations credited to its vibrant citizenry. The Houstorian Dictio... read more

New Mexico Chiles

Kelly Urig

To some, chile might be considered a condiment, but in New Mexico it takes center stage. Going back four centuries, native tribes, Spanish missionaries, conquistadors and Anglos alike craved capsicum, and chile became infused in the state's cuisine, culture and heritage. Beloved events like the annual Fiery Foods Show bring together thousands of artisans specializing in chile. The Chile Pepper... read more

To some, chile might be considered a condiment, but in New Mexico it takes center stage. Going back four centuries, native tribes, Spanish missionaries, conquistadors and Anglos alike craved capsicum, and chile became infused in the state's cuisine, culture and heritage. Beloved events like the annual Fiery Foods Show bring together thousands of artisans specializing in chile. The Chile Pepper... read more

Hope & New Orleans: A History of Crescent City Street Names

Sally Asher

New Orleans is a city of beautiful contradictions, evidenced by its street names. New Orleans crosses with Hope, Pleasure and Duels. Religious couples with Nuns, Market and Race. Music, Arts and Painters are parallel. New Orleans enfolds its denizens in the protection of saints, the artistry of Muses and the bravery of military leaders. The city’s street names are inseparable from its diverse ... read more

New Orleans is a city of beautiful contradictions, evidenced by its street names. New Orleans crosses with Hope, Pleasure and Duels. Religious couples with Nuns, Market and Race. Music, Arts and Painters are parallel. New Orleans enfolds its denizens in the protection of saints, the artistry of Muses and the bravery of military leaders. The city’s street names are inseparable from its diverse ... read more

Vegan Survival Guide to Austin (American Palate)

Carolyn Tracy, Julie Wernersbach

In the land of barbecue, Austin has become a vegan's paradise. Vegan trailers, restaurants, tacos, ice cream and even barbecue have taken root in Austin in a big way. From queso and cupcakes to macrobiotic feasts and tempting tempeh, the Capital City has elevated cruelty-free cuisine to new heights. With this handy guide, navigate all that Austin's busy vegan scene has to offer. Discover the f... read more

In the land of barbecue, Austin has become a vegan's paradise. Vegan trailers, restaurants, tacos, ice cream and even barbecue have taken root in Austin in a big way. From queso and cupcakes to macrobiotic feasts and tempting tempeh, the Capital City has elevated cruelty-free cuisine to new heights. With this handy guide, navigate all that Austin's busy vegan scene has to offer. Discover the f... read more

Stories from the St. Louis Cemeteries of New Orleans (Landmarks)

Sally Asher

The tombs and graves of the St. Louis Cemeteries rise from the ground, creating labyrinthine memorials aptly dubbed "cities of the dead." Most are in even rows with quaint street names. Some are of crumbling brick and broken marble. Others are miniature mansions clad in decorative ironwork with angelic guardians. Grand or humble, each is a relic of the story of New Orleans. Politicians, pirate... read more

The tombs and graves of the St. Louis Cemeteries rise from the ground, creating labyrinthine memorials aptly dubbed "cities of the dead." Most are in even rows with quaint street names. Some are of crumbling brick and broken marble. Others are miniature mansions clad in decorative ironwork with angelic guardians. Grand or humble, each is a relic of the story of New Orleans. Politicians, pirate... read more

Austin's First Cookbook

Michael C. Miller

Tacos and barbecue command appetites today, but early Austinites indulged in peppered mangoes, roast partridge and cucumber catsup. Those are just a few of the fascinating historic recipes in this new edition of the first cookbook published in the city. Written by the Cumberland Presbyterian Church in 1891, Our Home Cookbook aimed to "cause frowns to dispel and dimple into ripples of laughter"... read more

Tacos and barbecue command appetites today, but early Austinites indulged in peppered mangoes, roast partridge and cucumber catsup. Those are just a few of the fascinating historic recipes in this new edition of the first cookbook published in the city. Written by the Cumberland Presbyterian Church in 1891, Our Home Cookbook aimed to "cause frowns to dispel and dimple into ripples of laughter"... read more

A Stake in West Texas: Pulling a Chain and Raising a Family Across Big Oil Country

Rebecca D. Henderson

In 1950, Ann was eighteen and Bob D twenty when he asked her to marry him and hit the road for West Texas. They packed their station wagon, left home and began a life of adventure together on Conoco’s West Texas survey crew during the 1950s oil boom. Five kids, twenty-one towns and thirteen years on the road—Bob D and Ann’s travels along the highways of West Texas are a portrait in a landscape... read more

In 1950, Ann was eighteen and Bob D twenty when he asked her to marry him and hit the road for West Texas. They packed their station wagon, left home and began a life of adventure together on Conoco’s West Texas survey crew during the 1950s oil boom. Five kids, twenty-one towns and thirteen years on the road—Bob D and Ann’s travels along the highways of West Texas are a portrait in a landscape... read more

The Inspiring Life of Eudora Welty

Richelle Putnam, John Aycock

Eudora Alice Welty led an exciting and surprising life. Before she won a Pulitzer Prize, as a little girl she made her own books and won national poetry prizes. As a young woman during the Great Depression, she was a photographer and took pictures all over the South. These and other stories pack the life of one of Mississippi’s most famous authors. With author and teacher Richelle Putnam, lear... read more

Eudora Alice Welty led an exciting and surprising life. Before she won a Pulitzer Prize, as a little girl she made her own books and won national poetry prizes. As a young woman during the Great Depression, she was a photographer and took pictures all over the South. These and other stories pack the life of one of Mississippi’s most famous authors. With author and teacher Richelle Putnam, lear... read more

Hattiesburg, Mississippi: A History of the Hub City

Benjamin Morris

Founded by William Hardy at the confluence of rivers and rail lines, Hattiesburg, Mississippi, is today a capital of education, healthcare, commerce and the armed forces in the Gulf South. In this new biography of the Hub City, experience its story as you never have before. Hunt and forage alongside Native American tribes centuries before European settlement. Build a cabin with pioneer lumberm... read more

Founded by William Hardy at the confluence of rivers and rail lines, Hattiesburg, Mississippi, is today a capital of education, healthcare, commerce and the armed forces in the Gulf South. In this new biography of the Hub City, experience its story as you never have before. Hunt and forage alongside Native American tribes centuries before European settlement. Build a cabin with pioneer lumberm... read more

The Juke Joint King of the Mississippi Hills: The Raucous Reign of Tillman Branch

Janice Branch Tracy

In the swamps and juke joints of Holmes County, Mississippi, Edward Tillman Branch built his empire. Tillman’s clubs were legendary. Moonshine flowed as patrons enjoyed craps games and well-know blues acts. Across from his Goodman establishment, prostitutes in a trysting trailer entertained men, including the married Tillman himself. A threat to law enforcement and anyone who crossed his path,... read more

In the swamps and juke joints of Holmes County, Mississippi, Edward Tillman Branch built his empire. Tillman’s clubs were legendary. Moonshine flowed as patrons enjoyed craps games and well-know blues acts. Across from his Goodman establishment, prostitutes in a trysting trailer entertained men, including the married Tillman himself. A threat to law enforcement and anyone who crossed his path,... read more

Mississippi Moonshine Politics

Janice Branch Tracy

For most states, the repeal of prohibition meant a return to a state of legally drunken normalcy, but not so in Mississippi. The Magnolia State went dry over a decade before the nation, leaving bootleggers to establish political and financial holds they were unwilling to lose. For nearly sixty years, bootlegging flourished, and Mississippi became known as the "wettest dry state in the country.... read more

For most states, the repeal of prohibition meant a return to a state of legally drunken normalcy, but not so in Mississippi. The Magnolia State went dry over a decade before the nation, leaving bootleggers to establish political and financial holds they were unwilling to lose. For nearly sixty years, bootlegging flourished, and Mississippi became known as the "wettest dry state in the country.... read more

Party Weird: Festivals & Fringe Gatherings of Austin

Howie Richey

In 1839, Texas officials toasted their new capital of Austin, and its citizens never ran out of excuses for revelry. Austinites celebrate their homegrown and vibrant culture, renowned and innovative music, street life and collective quirkiness with pride. While world-class events now call the city home, in a culture that eschews conformity at every turn, Austin’s underground social gatherings ... read more

In 1839, Texas officials toasted their new capital of Austin, and its citizens never ran out of excuses for revelry. Austinites celebrate their homegrown and vibrant culture, renowned and innovative music, street life and collective quirkiness with pride. While world-class events now call the city home, in a culture that eschews conformity at every turn, Austin’s underground social gatherings ... read more

Sonobeat Records: Pioneering the Austin Sound In the '60s

Ricky Stein

The music scene in Austin is known the world over, but it can place a considerable portion of its roots in a little-known but prolific indie label: Sonobeat Records. A small, independent label founded by father-and-son duo Bill Josey Sr. and Bill Josey Jr., Sonobeat set the stage for the Capital City’s musical legacy. The label’s brief but powerful tenure produced an enormous amount of music a... read more

The music scene in Austin is known the world over, but it can place a considerable portion of its roots in a little-known but prolific indie label: Sonobeat Records. A small, independent label founded by father-and-son duo Bill Josey Sr. and Bill Josey Jr., Sonobeat set the stage for the Capital City’s musical legacy. The label’s brief but powerful tenure produced an enormous amount of music a... read more

Hip Hop in Houston: The Origin and the Legacy

Maco L. Faniel

Rap-A-Lot Records, U.G.K. (Pimp C and Bun B), Paul Wall, Beyoncé, Chamillionaire and Scarface are all names synonymous with contemporary hip-hop. And they have one thing in common: Houston. Long before the country came to know the chopped and screwed style of rap from the Bayou City in the late 1990s, hip-hop in Houston grew steadily and produced some of the most prolific independent artists i... read more

Rap-A-Lot Records, U.G.K. (Pimp C and Bun B), Paul Wall, Beyoncé, Chamillionaire and Scarface are all names synonymous with contemporary hip-hop. And they have one thing in common: Houston. Long before the country came to know the chopped and screwed style of rap from the Bayou City in the late 1990s, hip-hop in Houston grew steadily and produced some of the most prolific independent artists i... read more

Galveston's Maceo Family Empire: Bootlegging and the Balinese Room

Richard B. McCaslin, Scott Belshaw, T. Nicole Boatman

At the dawn of the twentieth century, Galveston was a beacon of opportunity on the Texas Gulf Coast. Dubbed the “Wall Street of the Southwest,” its laissez-faire reputation called those hungry for success to its shores. Led by brothers Salvatore and Rosario at the height of Prohibition, the Maceo family answered that call and changed the Oleander City forever. They built an island empire of ga... read more

At the dawn of the twentieth century, Galveston was a beacon of opportunity on the Texas Gulf Coast. Dubbed the “Wall Street of the Southwest,” its laissez-faire reputation called those hungry for success to its shores. Led by brothers Salvatore and Rosario at the height of Prohibition, the Maceo family answered that call and changed the Oleander City forever. They built an island empire of ga... read more

Miracle on the Salt River: Water, Family & Farming In the Arizona Desert

Meredith Haley Whiteley

Following enactment of the Reclamation Act, the first federally constructed dam broke ground in Arizona’s Salt River Valley in 1905. With the inauguration of Roosevelt Dam, the distant dream of an abundant life in the desert became a reality. The dam and farmer-operated water distribution system tamed the vicious drought, created arable land and became an irrigation model for the West. With th... read more

Following enactment of the Reclamation Act, the first federally constructed dam broke ground in Arizona’s Salt River Valley in 1905. With the inauguration of Roosevelt Dam, the distant dream of an abundant life in the desert became a reality. The dam and farmer-operated water distribution system tamed the vicious drought, created arable land and became an irrigation model for the West. With th... read more

The Big Bend Cookbook: Recipes and Stories From the Heart of West Texas

Tiffany Harelik

Early settlers of the Big Bend honed a culture of self-reliance, resilience and creativity. Today, this is reflected in the diverse art, music and cuisine of the area that draw visitors undeterred by its isolation. Though sparsely populated, Big Bend is home to nationally acclaimed restaurants and chefs, as well as generations’ worth of family recipes. Travel town by town and plate by plate in... read more

Early settlers of the Big Bend honed a culture of self-reliance, resilience and creativity. Today, this is reflected in the diverse art, music and cuisine of the area that draw visitors undeterred by its isolation. Though sparsely populated, Big Bend is home to nationally acclaimed restaurants and chefs, as well as generations’ worth of family recipes. Travel town by town and plate by plate in... read more

New Orleans Boom & Blackout:: One Hundred Days in America's Coolest Hot Spot

Brian W. Boyles

As the 2013 Super Bowl approached, New Orleans rushed to present its best face to the world. Politicians, business leaders and tourism officials declared the rise of the "new New Orleans," a thriving city brimming with hope and energy. But as the spotlight neared, old conflicts and fresh controversies complicated the branding. The preparations revealed the strains of the post-Katrina recovery ... read more

As the 2013 Super Bowl approached, New Orleans rushed to present its best face to the world. Politicians, business leaders and tourism officials declared the rise of the "new New Orleans," a thriving city brimming with hope and energy. But as the spotlight neared, old conflicts and fresh controversies complicated the branding. The preparations revealed the strains of the post-Katrina recovery ... read more

1960s Austin Gangsters: (True Crime)

Jesse Sublett

Timmy Overton of Austin and Jerry Ray James of Odessa were football stars who traded athletics for lives of crime. The original rebels without causes, nihilists with Cadillacs and Elvis hair, the Overton gang and their associates formed a ragtag white trash mafia that bedazzled Austin law enforcement for most of the 1960s. Tied into a loose network of crooked lawyers, pimps and used car dealer... read more

Timmy Overton of Austin and Jerry Ray James of Odessa were football stars who traded athletics for lives of crime. The original rebels without causes, nihilists with Cadillacs and Elvis hair, the Overton gang and their associates formed a ragtag white trash mafia that bedazzled Austin law enforcement for most of the 1960s. Tied into a loose network of crooked lawyers, pimps and used car dealer... read more

Apache Sunrise:: Memories from San Carlos (American Heritage)

Sonja White David

In July of 1970, a red Volkswagen bus pulled into the dirt parking lot of the Bureau of Indian Affairs' offices on the San Carlos Apache Reservation in Arizona. It was 113 degrees as Sonja and Richard David, with their three children, stepped into a new world. On a job reassignment, the family left the turbulence of Chicago for a new start on the expansive high desert where the Apache leader G... read more

In July of 1970, a red Volkswagen bus pulled into the dirt parking lot of the Bureau of Indian Affairs' offices on the San Carlos Apache Reservation in Arizona. It was 113 degrees as Sonja and Richard David, with their three children, stepped into a new world. On a job reassignment, the family left the turbulence of Chicago for a new start on the expansive high desert where the Apache leader G... read more

Louis Jordan: Son of Arkansas, Father of R&B

Stephen Koch

Though you may not know the man, you probably know his music. Arkansas-born Louis Jordan’s songs like “Baby, It’s Cold Outside,” “Caldonia” and “Ain’t Nobody Here But Us Chickens” can still be heard today, decades since Jordan ruled the charts. In his five-decade career, Jordan influenced American popular music, film and more and inspired the likes of James Brown, B.B. King, Chuck Berry and Ra... read more

Though you may not know the man, you probably know his music. Arkansas-born Louis Jordan’s songs like “Baby, It’s Cold Outside,” “Caldonia” and “Ain’t Nobody Here But Us Chickens” can still be heard today, decades since Jordan ruled the charts. In his five-decade career, Jordan influenced American popular music, film and more and inspired the likes of James Brown, B.B. King, Chuck Berry and Ra... read more

Texas Adoption Activist Edna Gladney: A Life and Legacy of Love

Sherrie McLeRoy

In 1941, Greer Garson earned an Academy Award nomination for her portrayal of Fort Worth’s Edna Gladney in Blossoms in the Dust. All eyes turned toward the small yet mighty Gladney and her fight for children’s rights and adoption reform. Born in 1886, Edna Gladney was labeled as “illegitimate” from birth and, as an adult, lobbied for that label’s removal from all birth certificates. During Wor... read more

In 1941, Greer Garson earned an Academy Award nomination for her portrayal of Fort Worth’s Edna Gladney in Blossoms in the Dust. All eyes turned toward the small yet mighty Gladney and her fight for children’s rights and adoption reform. Born in 1886, Edna Gladney was labeled as “illegitimate” from birth and, as an adult, lobbied for that label’s removal from all birth certificates. During Wor... read more

Ross Youngs: In Search of a San Antonio Baseball Legend

David King

Though Ross Youngs has been enshrined in the National Baseball Hall of Fame since 1972, few have given his remarkable career its due. Born in Shiner and raised in San Antonio, Youngs played his first game as a professional at the age of sixteen, and just three years later, his contract was purchased by the New York Giants, one of baseball’s elite teams in the early twentieth century. Tragicall... read more

Though Ross Youngs has been enshrined in the National Baseball Hall of Fame since 1972, few have given his remarkable career its due. Born in Shiner and raised in San Antonio, Youngs played his first game as a professional at the age of sixteen, and just three years later, his contract was purchased by the New York Giants, one of baseball’s elite teams in the early twentieth century. Tragicall... read more

Senator Hattie Caraway: An Arkansas Legacy

Nancy Hendricks

Hattie Caraway unexpectedly became the first female U.S. senator in 1931 by filling the seat of her late husband. What her colleagues viewed as an honorary position was in fact the start of a distinguished career. Despite strong male opposition, Hattie won reelection and loyally and effectively served her constituency for twelve years through the difficult times of the Great Depression and Wor... read more

Hattie Caraway unexpectedly became the first female U.S. senator in 1931 by filling the seat of her late husband. What her colleagues viewed as an honorary position was in fact the start of a distinguished career. Despite strong male opposition, Hattie won reelection and loyally and effectively served her constituency for twelve years through the difficult times of the Great Depression and Wor... read more

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