Humor & Comedy

What's That Growing in My Sour Cream?

By

This book will launch on Apr 22, 2020. Currently, only those with the link can see it. 🔒

Worth reading 😎

Short and cheerful, this blog-style book touches upon several topics yet revolves mostly around the process of ageing in America.

Synopsis

Ever wonder why a fly is circling the deli? Why you walk into your spouse? What you can learn about aging from your dog? Wonder no more. Witty, insightful, and at times very personal, Sour Cream? is Brad Graber's nod to Erma Bombeck and Dick Cavett, with just a hint of Andy Rooney. You'll laugh, you'll cry, you'll wonder why you didn't buy the book sooner.

Brad Graber’s What’s That Growing In My Sour Cream? is a light hearted discussion revolving around many topics, but which centers mostly on the discussion of ageing. Based on his online blog publications, Graber writes humorous and tongue-in-cheek life observations, although not without some underlying form of graveness which makes the short entries relatable and affable.

               

Graber’s discussions are based on his life and the observations made on his surroundings. He discusses topics such as pets, travel, friendly gatherings, movie theaters, driving, spicy food, and caring for toenails in tone of amusement, even though at times Graber finds the space to delve into momentarily serious reflection on universal and rather sad subjects, such as the death of a parent, partner, or of a pet, and also American gun control laws. As he states in his introduction, he finds he is “fascinated by the human condition” in all of its contradictions and quirks. He brings this observational fascination at times into a comedy that is quite Seinfeldian (when Seinfeld is at his best). I am referring particularly to “The Traveling Big Head Show Coming to a Theater Near You”, “What’s the Deal With The Soda?”, and “Awkward Man Hugs”, which already read like part of a scripted episode.

              

 The writing is written in small entries often less than 100 words long, and these entries might follow through sometimes in continuation of a particular theme, which makes their separation a bit unnecessary. There is a mid-book surge of gratitude towards readers, which is quite nice, as well as several references (and contextual pitches) to his first book, The Intersect (of which an excerpt of the first two chapters is offered at the end). As this novel is a milestone in Graber’s personal and professional life, it gets a pass for otherwise being a blatant commercial in a comedic blog.  

              

 The process of ageing seems to be the main theme for most of these entries, and some short acute discussions are made such as to how once you have reached a certain age, your opinions are deemed irrelevant, and compares the generation of baby boomers of the present to the 80s. Although this is an emotional discussion for many, Graber seems to write with a slightly forgiving impartiality and detached amusement. Some other widely broached topics are food, cooking, eating, and overall grocery shopping consumerism.  

              

 Overall, Brad Graber’s book is an amusing read. It doesn’t quite stand out from the wide variety of other comedy blogs or books as much, and caters mainly to middle-class, senior white men, but it does speak on universal subjects. The overall tone is cheery and touches upon several subjects, and it is worth reading if you are looking for an entertaining blog-style read to take up your time and perhaps identify with. In addition, you can read the first two chapter of his book The Intersect if you are so inclined.




Reviewed by

Freelance content writer, editor, and translator with a literature MA. I'm passionate about all kinds of literature and art. I enjoy editing, reading, and writing creative and informative content to the best of my abilities. Originality, insight, and entertainment are priorities for me. #Scifi

Synopsis

Ever wonder why a fly is circling the deli? Why you walk into your spouse? What you can learn about aging from your dog? Wonder no more. Witty, insightful, and at times very personal, Sour Cream? is Brad Graber's nod to Erma Bombeck and Dick Cavett, with just a hint of Andy Rooney. You'll laugh, you'll cry, you'll wonder why you didn't buy the book sooner.

What's That Growing in My Sour Cream?

IN OUR HOUSE, WE HAVE A BAD HABIT


We keep certain items in the refrigerator far too long. Now, I’m not referring to the ketchup, mustard, relish, and that jar of jelly tucked in the door. When were they purchased? Who knows? They always taste fine. Which makes me wonder, does a condiment ever go bad? 


DAIRY


One thing that doesn’t hold up as well is dairy. You know when the milk has turned, by the flecks that appear in your coffee. Before plastic containers, I used to think those floating islands were pieces of wax from the carton. Of course, milk’s expiration date is front and center when you buy it. It’s not unusual to see people buried in the refrigerated section, butts sticking out of the dairy case, searching for the latest expiration date. But then most people use milk every day. The likelihood of its going bad is pretty slim. And if it does, coffee offers that early warning system before the milk is added to the cereal.


SOUR CREAM


Sour cream, on the other hand, is a different dairy story. We don’t use it often, but when we do, there’s always a half-used container sitting in the refrigerator. And, since I’m the guy who plans most of our meals and hates to waste food, that darn sour cream calls out to me: “How can you use me up today?” I usually have no idea. Until I do.


SURPRISE, SURPRISE


And when you think about it, doesn’t sour cream sound as if it has already gone bad? Sure, it does. Which makes its extended stay in the refrigerator even more alarming. I can’t tell you—though I’m about to anyway—how often I’ve peeked in the container and seen something nasty. Something green and fuzzy. Like the art project your kid might bring home from school. Only, with an added aroma.


LIFE


Perhaps sour cream is a metaphor for life! Delicious when it’s fresh, not so great when it’s old and expired. And it’s our job to think about how to use it all up in the most creative way. So, here’s to hoping that there’s nothing growing in your sour cream. That every day is a bright and happy one. And most important, that your expiration date affords you to do all the wonderful things you love with the people you love. Including eating blintzes, baked potatoes, and Mexican food. Which by the way, all go great with sour cream.

About the author

Brad Graber is the award-winning author of The Intersect and After the Fall. His latest release What’s That Growing in My Sour Cream? is a compilation of over seventy lifestyle essays from Brad’s blog: There, I Said It! A nod to Erma Bombeck and Andy Rooney, Graber's essays are sure to amuse. view profile

Published on March 05, 2020

Published by

40000 words

Genre: Humor & Comedy

Reviewed by

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