Poetry

The Lover's Rhapsody

By

This book will launch on Aug 3, 2020. Currently, only those with the link can see it. 🔒

Worth reading 😎

A book of nearly 100 ecstatic poems on God viewed as Love from an Afghani-origin author with a distinctly Persian style/flavor

Synopsis

Lovers are wildly passionate seekers of God.
They are intoxicated by their heart's longing for union with their Beloved.
They ache and pray with their whole beings for the Light behind all forms.
They thirst to drink the nectar of Love in every moment.
They hunger to explore and know what lies behind the veils of perceived reality.
They demand truth with their whole existence and will not settle for anything less.
They are misfits,
incapacitated by Love's hangover,
wandering the world seeking Home,
unable to dance to the rhythm of anything other than the celestial tune of the Universe.
They are the mystics, dreamers, healers, artists, poets,
singers, dancers, visionaries, empaths, shamans,
and ultimately, the devoted ones to the Heart of life.

With nearly one hundred ecstatic love poems and dozens of bonus verses written in the literary style of great Sufi masters like Rumi, Hafez, and Shams-i-Tabriz, multi-award-winning author Adam Malik Siddiq has created a timeless poetic masterpiece that's destined to awaken every heart that reads these words. Written during the experiences of spiritually awakened states, these transmissions will quench the thirst of every soul seeker.

The Lover’s Rhapsody: Ecstatic Love Poems of Rapture, Awakening, and God by Adam Siddiq is a collection of nearly 100 short poems celebrating Love (i.e., God) and the joys experienced by rhapsodizing them. Typically, a poem is about three pages long, followed by a beautiful, one-page photograph that helps you dwell on and enjoy the meaning of the poem you just read.


Love (God) is the theme of this book. The author is a passionate disciple of Love and his poems dwell deeply on the panorama of God’s attributes, viz. Truth, Creator, Secret behind diversity in creation, Author of glory and beauty in creation, Source of all meaning and wisdom, the Beginning and End of life, etc.


I was left with mixed reactions after reviewing this book. One indicator of good poetry is clarity and a beautiful delivery of meaning that usually leaves an unforgettable imprint in the mind of the reader. While the author has tried to, he somehow fails to express clear meaning in many of the poems in this book. He succeeds in a few but fails in the majority. Two poems where he does succeed and I like a lot are: ‘Where Does A Tree Begin? Where Does A Tree End?’ (pp.40-43) and ‘Sweet Silence’ (pp. 202-203).


The author is not a native English speaker and this results in another problem. While the poetry attempts to be powerful, I found places where the choice of words deflect a little from the actual meanings intended. The result is a subtle lack of clarity. The following is an example to make my point clear. (It uses the concluding stanza of the first poem in the book, titled The Lover’s Rhapsody):


The moonlight filled

the windows of my mind

and I lost my-self.

Doubts turned to smiles,

fears turned to joys,

as I became the Celestial Tune

that makes constellations sing as One.”


Paraphrased (and expanded a bit) it may read as: “My heart was immersed in the moonlight that entered through the windows of my mind and I lost myself (in it). (In the light that entered, I could see clearly, so) doubts (that caused me to worry vanished) and I was smiling, fears (were dispelled) so I was filled with joy (and as a result, I found) I became the Celestial Tune that makes constellations sing as One.” The italicized phrases in brackets are the ‘gaps’. As you read along, you’ll notice that the narrative brought you very close to the intended meanings at places but deflected slightly so you missed them by just a hand-breadth! The gaps blur the meanings and turn into an issue of clarity when they repeat in close succession.


The author is a passionate follower of some of the ancient Persian poets, particularly Rumi (1207-1273). Their influence is amply evident in his work. Due to the Persian legacy, I believe it has a worldwide audience, particularly in all countries where Arabic speaking communities reside. Those who would root for it may be audiences in the Middle East, Afghanistan, Africa, India, and Pakistan where Persian poetry and music have large followings. I recommend it primarily to them.

Reviewed by

An engineer and part-time IT Consultant based in Bangalore, India. Part-time copy editor/reviewer. A deep thinker and innovator. Highly analytical, clear, accurate, and thorough. Worked with OnlineBookClub since June 2018. Nearly 25 book reviews published to date.

Synopsis

Lovers are wildly passionate seekers of God.
They are intoxicated by their heart's longing for union with their Beloved.
They ache and pray with their whole beings for the Light behind all forms.
They thirst to drink the nectar of Love in every moment.
They hunger to explore and know what lies behind the veils of perceived reality.
They demand truth with their whole existence and will not settle for anything less.
They are misfits,
incapacitated by Love's hangover,
wandering the world seeking Home,
unable to dance to the rhythm of anything other than the celestial tune of the Universe.
They are the mystics, dreamers, healers, artists, poets,
singers, dancers, visionaries, empaths, shamans,
and ultimately, the devoted ones to the Heart of life.

With nearly one hundred ecstatic love poems and dozens of bonus verses written in the literary style of great Sufi masters like Rumi, Hafez, and Shams-i-Tabriz, multi-award-winning author Adam Malik Siddiq has created a timeless poetic masterpiece that's destined to awaken every heart that reads these words. Written during the experiences of spiritually awakened states, these transmissions will quench the thirst of every soul seeker.

The Lover's Rhapsody

Lovers pitch tents under the stars and stay up all night rhapsodizing in awe about the Soul of the Universe. 


One lover begins their tale, 

“This Mysterious Presence, 

this Illuminating Essence, 

lifts my soul with Transcendence! All illusions 

dissipate into the Light. 

All that’s real 

shines so bright!” 


Another lover shares their tale,

“The Miracle Maker, 

the Heart’s Waker, 

Love’s Caretaker, 

the Cosmic Matchmaker, whispered to my soul 

a million love poems 

in one silent breath. 

Ever since, 

I remain wakeful, 

ever-present, 

in my patient waiting, 

ever-yearning, 

for another moment 

of Love’s euphoric kiss.” 


A third lover shares their tale, 

“I used to look above 

from below 

feeling so separate 

from all I wish to know, 

until… 

one night, 

as I stared into the moonlight, 

the moon whispered to my heart, 


‘The brilliance you seek is what you are.’ 


My timid soul asked the moon, 


‘Dear moon, 

how do you know this to be true? You hover above 

and shine such beautiful light 

on all of us below. 

Your brilliance is beyond anything I can ever imagine to be and anything I can ever aspire to be.

I am nothing. 

You are something phenomenal.’ 


The moon smiled. 

‘Dear soul, 

is it not my light. 

It is not my brilliance. 

I am only a reflection 

of the Brilliance 

that you are. 

I am only a reflection 

of the Light 

that you are. 

You are no-thing. 

You are the Delight 

that makes the galaxies swirl.

You are the Infatuation 

that inspires the cosmos 

to passionately manifest chaos into order… 

some-thing 

from no-thing.’ 


The moonlight filled 

the windows of my mind and I lost my-self. 

Doubts turned to smiles, fears turned to joys, 

as I became the Celestial Tune that makes constellations sing as One.” 

About the author

Adam Malik Siddiq is the grandson of Khaled Siddiq. Adam wrote SHACKLED alongside his grandfather, Khaled—a shared journey they hope will inspire others to become more involved in the sacred bond between the youth and their elders. He also wrote the bestselling poetry book, "The Lover's Rhapsody". view profile

Published on May 22, 2020

Published by Lineage Publishing

20000 words

Genre: Poetry

Reviewed by

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