DiscoverBiographies & Memoirs

The Last Lead Holders - Quest for Fulfillment

By

Loved it! 😍

Learning how to be free and treating life as an adventure are the keys to Deatherage's zest for life.

Synopsis

Everyone is on their own personal quest for fulfillment, finding out how to survive in the late 20th century helped the author Richard Deatherage achieve an impossible dream in architecture at a very young age ...learn first hand how computers came into the work place, changing careers over time, and how the recession of 2008 ended the career of “the last lead holder” ...today, as we all struggle with the uncertain times brought upon us by the pandemic of COVID-19 in 2020 ...there was a similar moment in time during the great recession of 2008, were the author tells of his struggles through his unemployment hardship's during the recession, while helping his ailing father adjust to his longtime illness ...he passes by the family photos on the stairway walls as he is reminded of his happy childhood, reminiscing stories lost in time with his father ...he tells of a remarkable adventure and a string of fortuitous circumstances that started his architectural career ...as his fathers final wishes come true ...this heart felt memoir will make you laugh, cry and reminisce of days gone by, standing as is a tribute to teachers, mentors, business professionals and to the love of family.

Richard Deatherage has an enthusiasm for life that fills every page in this memoir, which is part travelogue, part history lesson, part business manual and part “coming of age” story.


As a U.S. Air Force brat (AFB) he and his family moved every four years across the United States. Being uprooted constantly, leaving familiar places and friends behind, might have been daunting to some children but not Deatherage. He reveled in the nomadic life: experiencing the bone chilling cold of a S. Dakota winter; being awed by the majesty of the Grand Canyon; amused at the largest ball of twine in Kansas; and discovering London Bridge and Roy Roger’s stuffed horse Trigger in Arizona.


His cultural reminisces about listening to the music of Elvis, the Beatles, the Rolling Stones and the Carpenters on vinyl records add a touch of nostalgia. That was offset by worry watching Walter Cronkite on the nightly news reporting on the Vietnam War and hoping his soldier father, stationed there, was safe.


He didn’t have to watch television to learn about integration. Attending first grade in Mississippi he and his class were part of the busing program of the sixties to integrate schools. One day he saw his kind, loving father morph into an intimidating Marine challenging white racists.


Taking his father’s advice , “…that no matter what happens in your life, you are the only one who can fix it…” he became self-sufficient and unconstrained by convention. The teenage Deatheridge showed early entrepreneurial skills and his independent streak whether selling salmon he caught, changing grades on report cards for money or operating a under-aged liquor business out of a grocery store. But when a real opportunity came along he was smart enough to jump at the chance. Even though he was still only a teenager he managed to impress his bosses and win an award.


Living in the same house on the same street in the same town for your childhood can certainly provide a comforting sense of continuity and conformity. Many people strive for just that kind of conventional life. But the lack of those boundaries perfectly suited Deatherage’s boundless curiosity and independent spirit.


Deatheridge says that, “freedom is one of the greatest fortunes your parents can ever give to you”. Learning how to be free and treating life as an adventure are the keys to his interesting life and a lesson for all of us.


Reviewed by

Book reviewer for the Lawrence Technological University library. Wayne State University 2009 HASTAC (Humanities, Arts, Science, and Technology Alliance and Collaboratory) scholar concentrating on digital storytelling WWII oral historian for the Yankee Air Museum. Tour director and public speaker,

Synopsis

Everyone is on their own personal quest for fulfillment, finding out how to survive in the late 20th century helped the author Richard Deatherage achieve an impossible dream in architecture at a very young age ...learn first hand how computers came into the work place, changing careers over time, and how the recession of 2008 ended the career of “the last lead holder” ...today, as we all struggle with the uncertain times brought upon us by the pandemic of COVID-19 in 2020 ...there was a similar moment in time during the great recession of 2008, were the author tells of his struggles through his unemployment hardship's during the recession, while helping his ailing father adjust to his longtime illness ...he passes by the family photos on the stairway walls as he is reminded of his happy childhood, reminiscing stories lost in time with his father ...he tells of a remarkable adventure and a string of fortuitous circumstances that started his architectural career ...as his fathers final wishes come true ...this heart felt memoir will make you laugh, cry and reminisce of days gone by, standing as is a tribute to teachers, mentors, business professionals and to the love of family.

Chapter One

In November of 2008, I was told by my employers that I would be laid off from work by the end of that year. That the construction lending had fallen through for our clients projected for the 2009 construction season. 

I was not alone; many companies had been laying off their workers that year and it was not a big surprise to me at the time. It was all over the news that we were in a bad recession and I knew that it was going to get worse after the holiday season. 

I had been through a few recessions in the late 1970s and through the early ’80s and ’90s. I had always worked through them, changing as I needed to from my many past versatile experiences as a carpenter, draftsman, builder, and construction superintendent for other builders. 

I had always kept adaptable and open to change. But this time the economic indicators were different. For the first time in my thirty-year working career at forty-six years of age, I was laid off from work and unemployed with no work to be had. Like many millions of others.

I did prepare ahead of time, seeing the inevitable approaching, having been through recessions in the past. My credit was still great and I still had a corporate business that was still active from my previous business adventures, just in case I ever needed it to start a new venture.  

At the time, I had two options: I could find another job, which was impossible at that time because no one was hiring. Or I could go into debt, to jump start my business to find a client with the cash to design and build their new home. The odds were not good at the time to find the needle in a haystack.

This was the last thing I wanted to do—go into business again and go into debt. I enjoyed working for other large construction firms and I was enjoying not having to worry about draws, meeting payroll, etc.

I was overseeing the construction jobs in the field as a construction superintendent to beat the deadline under time and under budget. I was enjoying the challenge of what I was doing.  

I had gone on unemployment after my lay-off and started to receive 

my unemployment checks regularly. My wife Sarah was still working as a waitress at the time and she had been a waitress for over thirty years, enjoying what she was doing for a living. 

We could pay our mortgage but were unable to budget for my truck payments. So, I had to dip into my 401K to pay off my truck and some credit card debts. 

After we settled into a new budget to save our home, we could pay all our household bills with $50 to spare each month. We could make it on unemployment and with my wife’s income until I could find a new client. 

It was a very tight budget and I continued looking for work through the state’s unemployment network.

At the same time, my father’s health was failing, as he had been diagnosed with the lung disease pulmonary fibrosis six years prior. It was starting to take a toll on him during the winter months.

I soon found out that being laid off from work was a blessing for me, as well as it being so for our family. I was able to spend more time with my ailing father as we started to plan for the inevitable, during a very difficult time in our family’s history.  

Starting with the remodeling of my parents’ bathrooms to be handicap accessible, I was available to help set up a new routine with Mom and Dad, as we planned together for the final outcome that comes with such preparations.

I also had a new drive in my life, a re-evaluation of sorts as I worked on my parents’ bathroom remodels. I cherish those moments I had with my father, who supervised the bathroom projects in a role reversal.

My parents’ stairway was full of family photos and each time I went up the stairs to remodel the bathrooms, I would stop and look at the photos. I was reminded of the great times that I had had growing up and of all that Mom and Dad had done for my brothers and I. 

For in my youth, we had moved every four years all over the United States of America, from air force base to air force base. Up until the time I was twelve years old, I had started to relive all of the amazing adventures my family had been through in the 1960s and 1970s. 

The family adventures we had and the encouragement we had all been given by my parents over the years as USAFBs was a story lost in time. 

I started to reflect on my childhood with my parents growing up, and going over picture albums of all the great memories we had as a family. 

All of us boys had started our own families years before, working and living our own lives to come back full circle to the beginning of the end of our father’s life. 

Looking back, I believe that the freedoms that I had in my life experiences growing up may have held the answers to being happy in life.  

Only then can you realize that in life as well as in death, that freedom is one of the greatest fortunes your parents can ever give to you and the grounded life of a good family upbringing is the icing on the cake.
























About the author

(1963-present) Richard Deatherage, was born in Santa Maria, California. being versatile in his career, he is also a carpenter, draftsman, builder, building large Commercial projects throughout the Pacific north west; Washington, Oregon, California, & Nevada... lives in, Northern California. view profile

Published on November 26, 2020

Published by

50000 words

Contains explicit content ⚠️

Worked with a Reedsy professional 🏆

Genre: Biographies & Memoirs

Reviewed by

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