DiscoverCultural & Ethnic

Ngozi Blessing

By

Worth reading 😎

Ngozi Blessing is a short story that can be described as a pure African fairy tale, with all the life lessons it gives.

Synopsis

If you are looking for a magical story where supernatural forces become involved, then you have to read NGOZI. This book is set in Africa, but its eternal values of kindness, courage and compassion are worldwide and could exist anywhere.

This is a story that I read in one sitting, while being on my way home. The aspect that I really liked was how much it reminded me of a Senegalese tale I've been told since childhood: "Kumba am ndey ak Kumba amul ndey" (translated from Wolof, it means "Kumba who had a mother and Kumba who didn't have a mother").


The two tales are similar in the way they give lessons about how children should always respect their elders and be polite to them, for they always know better and could take the punishment of those children in their own hands. The only thing different about Ngozi is the happy ending, which I guess was to be expected since, even when things kind of went sideways, the story still remained whimsical (the Senegalese tale I mentioned has a much darker ending.)


Overall Ngozi was a really great read; I especially loved the precision with which the author described the food (I'd come across the term "egusi soup" in a lot of other books, but I never knew what it was exactly) and all that contributed to giving this story a realistic touch. The only thing that bothered me was how things were a little rushed around the end, but it didn't hurt the story very much.


Strongly recommend for a quick and enjoyable read!

Reviewed by

I read a lot of books and love to share my experiences about them. I'm a French-speaker but I read both French and English-written books.

Synopsis

If you are looking for a magical story where supernatural forces become involved, then you have to read NGOZI. This book is set in Africa, but its eternal values of kindness, courage and compassion are worldwide and could exist anywhere.

Echaria's Misfortune

This story took place in one of the lush tropical areas of Africa, where slow-moving elephants lumbered their way around the dusty plains looking for a water hole and the fiercely handsome hippos stalked their prey and protected their young.

Patiently pacing in his harem, the lion waited for the return of the lioness, victorious with the catch of the day. Here, too, the zebras pranced about, unsuspecting prey to the predators—all participants in the food chain, nature’s way of control.

While the hawks, eagles, and vultures soared above, waiting to seize their meal, the birds chirped so loudly, it seemed as if they were competing with each other to see which one was the loudest.

The coolness of the night made one forget the sweltering heat of the sun that beat down mercilessly during the day.

The villages were not very far away, and the rhythm of activity was seldom interrupted.

The laughter, sadness, anger, and pain were ongoing, and every- one took it in stride.

The villagers’ daily lifestyle was relatively calm, simple, and peaceful, without any significant interruption. The women took care of the children and the home and worked on the farms, while the men hunted and did their part of the farming.

At night, before bedtime, the family gathered around the fire, and the older women told them stories. These stories were handed down through the ages—stories that made you laugh, stories that made you fear the dark, stories that taught you about the good and evil forces existing and influencing everyday lives.

This is one such story that was passed down through the ages to children while they sat around the fireplace, after eating their fill of gari and egusi soup, a rich, mouthwatering stew made from the grounded egusi seed.

This story was retold by grandparents and great-grandparents, until it was told to me while living in the Caribbean islands, as I lay snug in my blanket that I shared with my seven cousins.

I recall the storyteller vaguely. It was so long ago, but the story stayed with me for seven decades, and so I must pass it along to you.

About the author

Cynthia Banks-Obinabo has been an Elementary School Teacher for many years.Her love for reading and her love for story telling is evident in this book. She hopes you'll enjoy reading it as much as she loved writing it.She has also written four non-fiction Ebooks that can be purchased on Amazon view profile

Published on July 18, 2019

Published by

5000 words

Genre: Cultural & Ethnic

Reviewed by

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