Loved it! 😍

Truly a one-of-a-kind experience for science fiction fans and lovers of technology!

Synopsis

“A stellar futuristic tale with an exemplary heroine.”
—Kirkus Reviews

“IGIST could be described as perhaps Star Wars meets Harry Potter.”
—Leah Day Smith, 7th Grade Teacher, Pleasant Grove Jr. High

“My son texted me from school during the day to tell me how much he loved the book!”
—Science in the City

In the not-so-distant future when humanity has colonized the solar system, orbiting the moon is a space academy called IGIST (Intergalactic Institute of Science and Technology; pronounced “eye-gist”) that embodies a simple ethos: No matter what problems we face an idea can prevail.

A young girl named Emi dreams of escaping the plague-ravaged Earth, attending the elite IGIST, and becoming a great scientist. Against all odds, she makes it into space and with a colorful cast of misfits, Martians, and scouts, races against the clock to create an antidote for the deadly amoebic monster, that is the plague.

Plus, download the IGIST app on iOS to bring the black and white illustrations in the book to life as animations appearing in Augmented Reality, in addition to other awesome features! The IGIST app will also be available on Android platforms on April 20th, 2019.

IGIST’s premise alone was enough to grab my attention, but more than just a good story and characters, this book has a one-of-a-kind feature… It has an accompanying AR app. That’s right. You can watch this book come to life with Augmented Reality (like SnapChat filters) and turn your black and white illustrations into moving, colorful images on your phone!


Tech and gadgets are some of my favorite things and if I was rating the book on how well done and cool the app is alone, it would get a solid 5 out of 5 stars before I even opened the book. The graphics are absolutely incredible, the fun “sputniks” that jump out at you while you’re reading, and the holographic features genuinely make this book an immersive novel. There are many more features that I could list here, but my recommendation is to just jump on the IGIST bandwagon!


As for the book itself, it will receive 4 out of 5 stars. The storyline is certainly interesting to say the very least. There are plenty of characters to get to know, it is void of any cursing and sexual content. All things that really pleased me. However, it seems to teeter on the line between middle grade fiction and young adult fiction very often, and what I mean by that is, a lot of the story seems a little too young for advanced readers, but the content and vocabulary is incredibly advanced for middle graders. I think IGIST has many things to please both audiences, but there is that chance that some middle graders won’t understand the tech/science scenes at all, and some young adult readers won’t be impressed with the shorter scenes and less descriptive details.


There is some action present, mentions of blood, as well as a character that partakes in gambling and some activity that is considered “illegal” in the world of IGIST.


Overall, IGIST is a universe that is worthy of a fanclub, and believe me when I say that it has so much potential. I do plan on following this up and rising immersive novel and if you have a science fiction nut in your family, they definitely need to give this experience a shot.


I received this book from the author via Reedsy for the purpose of this review. All comments and opinions are entirely my own.


This is a LiteratureApproved.com Review.

Reviewed by

I am an avid reader though just as much of my time is spent writing as it is reading. I am a Book-Reviewer and the Founder of Literature Approved. Former Jr. Literary Agent for CYLE Literary Elite/ Hartline. Web Manager and Social Media Manager for various parties. And Soon-to-be Novelist.

Synopsis

“A stellar futuristic tale with an exemplary heroine.”
—Kirkus Reviews

“IGIST could be described as perhaps Star Wars meets Harry Potter.”
—Leah Day Smith, 7th Grade Teacher, Pleasant Grove Jr. High

“My son texted me from school during the day to tell me how much he loved the book!”
—Science in the City

In the not-so-distant future when humanity has colonized the solar system, orbiting the moon is a space academy called IGIST (Intergalactic Institute of Science and Technology; pronounced “eye-gist”) that embodies a simple ethos: No matter what problems we face an idea can prevail.

A young girl named Emi dreams of escaping the plague-ravaged Earth, attending the elite IGIST, and becoming a great scientist. Against all odds, she makes it into space and with a colorful cast of misfits, Martians, and scouts, races against the clock to create an antidote for the deadly amoebic monster, that is the plague.

Plus, download the IGIST app on iOS to bring the black and white illustrations in the book to life as animations appearing in Augmented Reality, in addition to other awesome features! The IGIST app will also be available on Android platforms on April 20th, 2019.

The Anchor

It had been fifty-four days since Emi submitted her application. Her mother had always hoped that Emi would one day attend IGIST, the Intergalactic Institute of Science and Technology. Every day that passed with her waiting to hear back about her admission became more and more unbearable.

The admission notification was legendary. If selected, the student would receive a miniature model of the space station. The model displayed a hologram image of the chancellor with a personalized message.

More than anything, she wanted to receive that notification. Emi was confident the package would be waiting when she got home, but first she had to endure a day of school at Rockland. Today was the last day that a model would arrive if she’d been accepted.


***


The teacher listed off the students as their names appeared on a leaderboard. He was old and gaunt with warm eyes. Although it seemed cruel to rank each student based upon secondary school, the list was a Rockland tradition. Mr. Lemore beamed with pride as he announced the placement of his students at top schools on Earth.

Two-thirds of Emi’s class was already placed, leaving only the bottom group. She stared at her name near the bottom of the list with no school beside it. The lower her name fell, the smaller she felt. She never thought her name might end up in last place. Emi watched Mr. Lemore walk to the leaderboard. Several students snickered about the six names still not placed.

Mr. Lemore rattled off five placements. Now only one student did not have a school listed on the leaderboard. All eyes in the class turned to Emi. It was official: her name sat at the bottom of the list in the dreaded anchor position. She wished she could climb under a rock and disappear; she felt as small as a speck of dust. Several students whispered her name under their breath. The tone in the air had shifted from elementary meanness to one of universal pity.

There was a certain irony in less intelligent pupils calling Emi stupid. She didn’t hate the other kids. She felt sorry for them. They would all be bygones. A few might make it to space, but the majority of her peers were destined to lead boring lives stuck on Earth. Emi’s ambitions included getting off the planet.

Emi looked out the window. Usually an orangish-gray smog hung over the dreary city, making it hard to see the sky. Today a strong wind had opened up the clouds, creating a blue and orange sky-canyon that framed the moon and the space station.

Earlier that day she had read about solar-sailing: students of IGIST would sail between the moon and the space station, using the sun’s light to propel them through space. She desperately wanted to be up in space and wondered how small Earth would look from the stars.

“Emi?”

Snapping out of her daydream, Emi noticed her peers filing out of the classroom.

“Come sit,” said Mr. Lemore.

She sat down near him, their two chairs facing each other. Emi had always liked her eighth-grade math teacher. She assumed the girl in the picture on his desk was his daughter. There were rumors she had dropped out of school.

“You must pick a school,” Mr. Lemore said. “You’ve received several acceptances. You are at risk of losing your spot if you don’t choose one. Franklin, Verity, even your safeties fill up fast. I’d hate for you to end up out of the school system. Here, I’ve prepared this packet for you to review.”

On the wall behind him hung a Legion poster. In the picture a teenager grimaced, wearing a drab gray jumpsuit and sitting behind a screen. For students who didn’t have the grades to go to a secondary school, a tiny percentage would go into a government work program known as the Legion. The program used to train people in trades, but since the automation era, it had devolved into a forced work program. Legion members wore caps to keep themselves focused on the monotonous tasks required.

“I’ve already picked IGIST.”

Mr. Lemore moved his chair closer to her and lowered his voice in a sympathetic tone. Emi could tell by the look in his eyes he cared about her.

“Emi, we’ve been over this. There are a million reasons you can’t go to IGIST.” He paused for a moment and looked back at the picture on his desk. He continued balancing a tone between parental sternness and sincere affection.

“There are countless odds stacked against you. In twenty years IGIST hasn’t issued a single acceptance to someone on Earth. It’s too expensive to get to space. You’d most likely get dropped from the probo screening. I’m not saying that you’re not smart enough, but the reality is that you just didn’t get accepted. We’re running out of time, Emi. You must consider the alternatives.”

Emi told herself to stay confident. After all, her parents raised her to be strong. “I should hear back today,” she informed her teacher.


About the author

L.S. Larson grew up in Washington State on the Olympic Peninsula in the small town of Forks. After becoming a father of three daughters, L.S. set out to write a sci-fi series that would not only be fun but also show his three daughters that they can be a great inventor and make a massive impact. view profile

Published on December 10, 2018

Published by IGIST Studios

70000 words

Genre: Young adult

Reviewed by

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