Psychological Thriller

Booth Island

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This book will launch on Mar 9, 2021. Currently, only those with the link can see it. 🔒

Worth reading 😎

Masterful, suspenseful, and engaging, Boothe does not know who to trust and neither will you.

Booth Island by D. Z. Church is a psychological thriller. Booth Island is a stand-alone novel, the first book that I have read by this author. D. Z. Church has written several other thrillers, including the historical thriller series Cooper Vietnam Era Quartet, with book four releasing soon.


Boothe “Boo” Threader has not been back to Booth Island in the nine years since her brother died a mysterious death. When Boothe’s mother gifts her the deed to Booth Island, she feels like her brother is calling her back, so she decides to go for the summer, just like they used to do as kids. Boothe’s relationship has been strained with both her parents since her brother died and they divorced. She returns to the Island filled with hate for the one that she thinks killed her brother.


Once Boothe is on the island she is reunited with her friends from the past, even ones who would not normally be there. In a strange set of circumstances, people begin to get hurt on Boothe island, and weird discoveries are made. The only way to describe it is that nothing is as it seems, and time and distance have a way of putting things into perspective.


I enjoyed this story. I love the cover illustration; it is perfect for the book. The writing is engaging, masterful, and full of twists and turns. It is hard to know who to trust and who’s motives are pure and who is evil. The story kept me guessing almost to the very end. The setting is ideal for the storyline, and the author builds the scenes well.


There were a few things that bothered me about the story too. At first, I kept getting lost in all the character introductions, it felt too rushed, introducing them so quickly. I almost gave up on the story because of that and a few of the author’s word choices. Booth Island is written in first-person but also uses past tense to describe things (more so at the beginning of the story), even though it is present tense. For example, “When I was young, everything rolled off the front of the porch into the dirt. The slope was much worse now. My coffee mug knocked over in the bustle of stashing items on the porch, rolled sideways before wobbling off with a thump.” Another example where I found some of the terminology weird – “Seeing my head cocked at the cage contraption, Tim fingered me over.” And again, “Over the years, my family had humped groceries, clothes, toys, and a Sailfish sailboat up the steep slope from Old Landing to the cabin.” The use of “fingered” is scattered throughout the story and I thought it was weird they had “humped” groceries up the steep slope. I do not know if those are common expressions in Canada, where the story is set, or just how the author chose to convey her thoughts. Regardless, they distracted me, and I had to look deeper to decide on how they were used in context. I am not a huge proponent of profanity in stories, but it was scattered throughout this one. While there are some romantic scenes, they are not graphic and overly detailed.  


I am glad I chose to continue to read the story because it was interesting, intriguing and I enjoyed seeing how everything ended. The author did a great job with this book. If you like mystery, suspense, psychological thrillers, then you will enjoy Booth Island.



Reviewed by

I am an avid book reader (book addict), I could literally spend all day reading and not get bored. We have books in every room except the bathrooms! I love learning new things through reading. *Prefer books with no profanity or explicit content.*

Boo Treader

About the author

D. Z. Church was a Naval Officer, a Director at a Fortune 500 Company, and always a writer, who discovered along the way, that people aren’t always as they seem, and that revenge is best served in a whopping good tale. view profile

Published on February 09, 2021

90000 words

Genre: Psychological Thriller

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