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If you've ever experienced hardship, these poems will allow you to see them in a new light.

Synopsis

"Amaranthine" is a poetry collection by Ami J. Sanghvi which details her six-year, young adult journey of love, hate, pain, anger, discovery, growth, and, survival. The poems delve into topics of abuse (emotional, mental, and physical) in both platonic and non-platonic relationships; there are also a handful of pieces which describe the aftermaths of surviving sexual harassment, assault, and violence without actually divulging those experiences themselves.

After breaking free from the [human] sources of her pain for the umpteenth time, the character struggles to keep her head above the surface. She has not been able to succeed at this venture in the past, but this time, her attempts at recovery result in something she’s never actually known before: a lengthy period of actual self-exploration, self-love, and independence.

First, I strongly recommend you read the preface, even if you're one of those people who usually skips past it assuming there is nothing worthwhile in its words. Before you can truly appreciate Sanghvi's work, you have to understand the definition of their collective title.


From the few lines in the opening, "Ninety Days," I knew Ami's poetry was something special. There is a little light even in the most heart-torn lyrics of pieces like "Before I Was A Mountain" and "Writhing/Slithering." Each line and stanza is utterly (ehem) poetic; revealing a strong and inspiring author. Sanghvi uses tragic and gruesome imagery to convey feelings of beauty, hopefulness, and the strength to carry on. It is a methodic style few creatives have ever mastered. However, it is my opinion that these masters are the truest artists mankind can produce.


Reading "Vigilante," "Maid," and "Slashed," I recognized the same feelings and situations that I have experienced myself but have never had the words to so beautifully describe. You may be forced to reminisce about the darkest times of your life but I promise you will be better for it. Sanghvi offers a kind of empowerment to the worst parts of life that I have never before found. Every time someone reads her words, "A Boxer Is Born." Moreover, there is a lesson in Amaranthine, a kind of warning about the less savory type of people that will try to make their way into our lives but who we should be proactive in identifying and ridding ourselves of if we value ourselves and our own best interest.


This collection is ultimately a lesson to the reader that all of us are "Louder" than our parts, experiences, feelings, hopes, conditions. We are not our "Prince Charming"s, we are what we learned from them. We are "[Un]fairer." If you are a human being, please read Amaranthine.

Reviewed by

Hey there! I'm a senior university student in Boulder, Colorado. I've had a variety of cultural influences in my life - particularly with language - and have found reading to be a great way to remind myself of the lives and stories that have made me who I am today.

Synopsis

"Amaranthine" is a poetry collection by Ami J. Sanghvi which details her six-year, young adult journey of love, hate, pain, anger, discovery, growth, and, survival. The poems delve into topics of abuse (emotional, mental, and physical) in both platonic and non-platonic relationships; there are also a handful of pieces which describe the aftermaths of surviving sexual harassment, assault, and violence without actually divulging those experiences themselves.

After breaking free from the [human] sources of her pain for the umpteenth time, the character struggles to keep her head above the surface. She has not been able to succeed at this venture in the past, but this time, her attempts at recovery result in something she’s never actually known before: a lengthy period of actual self-exploration, self-love, and independence.

Tsunami

You parted your lips

To devour me,

And havoc surged out,

Gushing from the gorge

Between your jaws,

Thrashing against me,

Septic tides barbaric

Contra this jaded flesh,

Purging me and my skin

Of all our convictions.


You were a tsunami

Hell-bent on slaughtering

Swallowing,

And entombing

The cosmos.

Nevertheless,

I,

An ardent inferno,

Mistook your crests

For love.

About the author

Ami J. Sanghvi is a 25-year-old, Indian-American poetry, fiction, and cross-genre writer. She is the author of four published poetry books: "Amaranthine," "Devolution," "Armageddon," and "Silk & Cigars." She's also an artist, mixed martial artist, and graduate student. view profile

Published on December 14, 2018

Published by

4000 words

Genre: Poetry

Reviewed by

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