Biographies & Memoirs

The Hay-wagon

By

This book will launch on Oct 15, 2020. Currently, only those with the link can see it. 🔒

Loved it! 😍

Be empowered and enlightened! A book that will illuminate your path, leading you to garner respect from others and to respect yourself.

Synopsis

The Hay-wagon uses short stories to weave together a narrative about searching for respect. Themes of trucking and heartbreak entwine in this memoir to empower young women in a badass feminist cautionary tale.

Not your typical book of short stories! No, these are intertwined, inter-related; and, more often then not, flow seamlessly from one short into another. Stories told that are reflections, honorary mentions, and life-changing moments that bring about life-altering respect; a tearing away, and a rising up.


In one moment in particular your breath will be taken away. Your stomach will drop and you'll have to re-read a passage to make sure you've read it right! You'll wish it weren't so. You'll come away with acknowledgement that even the most powerful females among us are still susceptible to succumb to the wiles of a "Gatlin".


In that, this is a cautionary tale. One of empathy, as witnessed within a doctor's office, that will remind of you of just how often a doctor sees the truth written clearly on a patient's face.


This is also a celebration, a coming of age, a recognition of our inherent power as women. We can set our minds on something and accomplish it even when odds ares stacked against us.


The conclusion reached eventually begets freedom. Freedom of self, freedom to feel, and a circle of life moment that will stay with the reader for a long time to come just as it will stay with the author for a lifetime.


As a reader/writer who collects quotes, the following sentences stood out to me:  "Two strangers passing on a highway had a connection. I wanted that." (Page 2);  "I lied to my whole community, but I didn’t mean to. I thought I’d been telling the truth." (Page 119);  "Questions are the root of all information, and maybe that’s why some people are scared of them." (Page 146); "I never really wanted to be a truck driver at all. I just wanted respect." (Page 167)


The "short story" titled "Mexican Water" is an ingenious tie-in. Hard-won, unasked for, insight and wisdom is now possessed: The questioning of self, the doubting, the wondering, is heartbreaking; but, it completely makes sense.


The author does a tremendous job of sharing herself, her life, and her stories in a way that you know is 100% genuine and trans-formative. A personal testament in regards to surviving an abusive relationship and moving on. A book recommended for all women. May eyes be opened, truth unveiled, lives saved, and respect given; never bow to peer pressure make the pressure bow to you.

Reviewed by

Reading books and writing reviews brings with it every emotion under the sun; forever changing, forever changed, and I wouldn't have it any other way. May my words not only help fellow readers but also the authors of the books we read.

Synopsis

The Hay-wagon uses short stories to weave together a narrative about searching for respect. Themes of trucking and heartbreak entwine in this memoir to empower young women in a badass feminist cautionary tale.

Highway Horn

“Hey, Abigail, watch this.”

I turned to watch Waylon as he pumped his fist up and down near the car window. Around five years old, I didn’t know what I was supposed to watch for until I heard it: a blasting highway horn from a passing semi. Back then, I didn’t know the term “highway horn” or that trucks also had city horns or that the motion Waylon did was the exact same motion the driver had to do to make that incredulous sound.

I couldn’t even see the driver, but I wondered about him. And about Waylon. How did Waylon know to pump his fist? And when? And how did he know the driver would see? And that the driver would respond? The driver was way up there, above our little car. He saw Waylon. He responded to Waylon. And he didn’t have to, either.

In my mind, the driver was basically Santa Claus, an old man way up high that looked in every car window for a little boy pumping his fist and proceeded to deliver joy. Two strangers passing on a highway had a connection. I wanted

that.

About the author

Abigail was born and is living, unless she has died. view profile

Published on August 20, 2020

Published by Belle Isle Books

30000 words

Genre: Biographies & Memoirs

Reviewed by

Enjoyed this review?

Get early access to fresh indie books and help decide on the bestselling stories of tomorrow. Create your free account today.

or

Or sign up with an email address

Create your account

Or sign up with your social account