DiscoverHorror

The Apartment

By

Must read 🏆

An impeccable sense of vulnerability was felt while reading this one, followed by a sense of feeling that I had to do something!

Synopsis

Alone in his apartment, one man copes with the onerous side-effects of his treatment for his chronic bipolar disorder, suffering suicidal ideation, akathisia, nausea, dizziness, and shifts from depression to self-targetted rage. When he thinks he has finally gotten a grasp on his condition, the world succumbs to devastation as an ancient god-like creature rises from the ocean to start the countdown on our world as we know it. As this man learns to cope with his condition throughout the apocalypse, everything changes when his treatment is no longer accessible due to a limited prescription. Anticipating the dreadful withdrawal and the devastating resurgence of his chronically-relapsing depression, this lone man must continue to suffer the apocalypse both in and outside his own mind, and attempt to find meaning for existence in times when no outside force will offer it.

The Apartment is a post-apocalyptic novella written by William Denomme. At 15 pdf pages, I easily read this one in one sitting, though I felt myself craving for more long after the story finished.


The main character in the story has already suffered unimaginable loss, but not at the hands of what you might imagine from the synopsis. After a failed suicide attempt, his girlfriend is no longer able to cope with his depressive mania and has to leave for her own good. His roommate and friend is shell-shocked beyond belief at his manic actions and flees after encountering one of the worst instances. Despite his previous ailments, the main character chooses to battle his illnesses alone and is seeming to succeed, that is, until he suddenly discovers that there is a world-wide pandemic spreading, with zombie creatures filling the streets and taking the lives of any and all.


The Apartment was a rather dark read, but one that I found myself completely engaged in despite it’s short duration. The sense of helplessness that filled me while reading of his own personal struggles, but also the struggles of possibly being one of the last survivors was overwhelming. His pain is palpable and raw, though he’s experienced so much darkness in his mind that this couldn’t possibly be the way his story ends... right?


Highly rated as a must-read from me, coming in with a rating of 5 stars, The Apartment is engaging and fully grabbed my attention from the first sentence. I found myself rooting for him, hoping against all odds that his desire to survive his illness and overpower the undead would prevail in a way to allow his story to continue as some part of a sense of victory. Even with high praise, I feel like I’m only grasping at the seams of the power this short story can have over readers and hope others will enjoy it as much as I have.


Due to the graphic depictions and dark themes expressed within the story, I’m giving a reader’s discretion that the story should only be read by mature readers. Trigger warning include subject matter such as suicide and self-harm, explicit gore depiction and severe episodes of mania.

Reviewed by

Hi! I’m Kourtney. I’m a full time accounting manager and a part time book reviewer. I’ve been an official member of the onlinebookclub review team for 4 years now, where I’ve gained a huge insight to the review and beta reading world.

Synopsis

Alone in his apartment, one man copes with the onerous side-effects of his treatment for his chronic bipolar disorder, suffering suicidal ideation, akathisia, nausea, dizziness, and shifts from depression to self-targetted rage. When he thinks he has finally gotten a grasp on his condition, the world succumbs to devastation as an ancient god-like creature rises from the ocean to start the countdown on our world as we know it. As this man learns to cope with his condition throughout the apocalypse, everything changes when his treatment is no longer accessible due to a limited prescription. Anticipating the dreadful withdrawal and the devastating resurgence of his chronically-relapsing depression, this lone man must continue to suffer the apocalypse both in and outside his own mind, and attempt to find meaning for existence in times when no outside force will offer it.

As I sit in the darkness of my apartment, I hear creatures scratching and banging against the exit door as they smell the savory scent of a final meal. There are not many humans left, and I wonder if this apartment complex is the last that holds human life. Indeed, for the past five years, it had felt as if there was no life outside of this mere apartment. Despite the apocalypse beginning three months ago, I have felt as if I was utterly alone for the better part of a decade. As a result, the banging I now hear against the door from mindless, bloodthirsty creatures is reminiscent of the sound of lost friends, family, and acquaintances trying to reach me. While these creatures wish to tear my soul from my body and feast on my mess of a corpse, leaving my apartment when in my crippling depression was more challenging than any mountain, river, or horde. Had I experienced what I have experienced in the these three months, I would have felt prepared to confront such challenges. However, this preparedness is far from willingness. I still think that those challenges would have been met with shallow reward as social vindication that felt completely irrelevant to my survival. Today, I would be capable of facing humans and their expectations, but I would be as understood by humans as by the very zombies outside my door.

Nevertheless, I longed for a time when I could show the world my progress and show pride in my work on my own personal well-being. When this all started, I was only on my first week of a month-long treatment regimen on Lurasidone. I was in the full force of the side effects that accompanied any therapeutic potential of this drug. Due to a highly treatment-resistant unspecified bipolar disorder characterized by chronically relapsing depression and hypomania, this drug was supposed to be the substance that would finally save my life from another suicide attempt.

The prelude to my prior suicide attempt began in times more everlasting in my mind than any apocalypse.

About the author

Award-winning forensic psychology PhD candidate. When not analyzing complicated datasets on mental illness in today's society, I am constantly thinking of new ways to communicate the struggles of mental illness to the world through its fusion with the powerful genres in the literature. view profile

Published on July 27, 2020

5000 words

Contains explicit content ⚠️

Genre: Horror

Reviewed by

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