DiscoverBiographies & Memoirs

Muslim, Christian, Jew — "I Do"

By

Must read 🏆

An unabashed, unfiltered look into one woman's life's journey; beautifully and tenderly rendered and wrote. Not to be missed; a must read!

Synopsis

From back cover:

For centuries the planet has witnessed episodic mistrust between Islam, Christianity and Judaism. But the planet is shrinking and many people, in their selection of a mate, will consider someone from another religion. This memoir sheds light on the level of awareness and communication needed to make such marriages viable, and scrutinizes the all too common scenario of young girls marrying for an identity. It provides, through lived experience, a fish-bowl view of one woman's journey through three interfaith marriages, told conversationally—right down to the sharing of recipes. Blended family dynamics and childhood cancer throw in further grist for the mill. A final, stormy divorce provides the catalyst for a much-needed character arc, discernment about women's identities, and the embrace of marriage as an endeavor more human than religious. And finally, it offers brief informational segments on marriage in Islam, Christianity and Judaism, along with some beautiful legends—all of which illustrate the commonality of marriage rather than the differences of dogma.

Lyrical, sweeping beauty from start to finish. A handful of editing bobbles/missed words, isn't enough to remove any one of the five stars this book received from me! It was brilliantly written and bravely shared.


Much can be learned within the pages of this book; and, it has found a permanent place on my bookshelf. Learn from mistakes, study oneself, grow; break the circular patterns that enslave and set yourself, and your loved ones, free.


It's eye-opening and good to recognize both the differences and similarities between what you know from your own life and the truth as seen from the view-point of others. However, having lived a life, myself, of a marriage that was culturally different; merging two, separate cultures or religions is difficult and ill-advised. There's a bedrock of faith and sameness that binds; and, when it's not present, there's divisiveness that's hard to overcome.


There is sadness and there is joy. Hazel Wise writes from a place of gratitude, reverence, self-knowledge, and maturity; if not also from a place of peace. She reveals much and I was able to see my own life's story in pieces of her's. This author wrote in a manner that is transparent, authentic, far from self-seeking; and, it's this letting others in that will help the reader to find and see themselves clearly too.


This book is insightful, enlightening, and just as the author's last name reveals: Wise.


By the end of this read, you will feel as though you've become a part of the author's life. You'll be able to share within the different cultures and traditions by adopting recipes into your kitchen that represent them. Within the recipes, within the gathering of people together, you will see, hear, and taste the joy.


Not all was lost, some things were gained; from the reeling emptiness that death and divorce leave in their wake, there will come a day when you no longer feel the depth of the loss in the same way. Through the reeling there does come healing. It's painful, it's slow; but, you do learn to mourn, accept, and let go.


The joy remains in the kitchen. The bittersweet triumph of having lived, loved, and learned found on a dinner plate.

Reviewed by

Reading books and writing reviews brings with it every emotion under the sun; forever changing, forever changed, and I wouldn't have it any other way. May my words not only help fellow readers but also the authors of the books we read.

Synopsis

From back cover:

For centuries the planet has witnessed episodic mistrust between Islam, Christianity and Judaism. But the planet is shrinking and many people, in their selection of a mate, will consider someone from another religion. This memoir sheds light on the level of awareness and communication needed to make such marriages viable, and scrutinizes the all too common scenario of young girls marrying for an identity. It provides, through lived experience, a fish-bowl view of one woman's journey through three interfaith marriages, told conversationally—right down to the sharing of recipes. Blended family dynamics and childhood cancer throw in further grist for the mill. A final, stormy divorce provides the catalyst for a much-needed character arc, discernment about women's identities, and the embrace of marriage as an endeavor more human than religious. And finally, it offers brief informational segments on marriage in Islam, Christianity and Judaism, along with some beautiful legends—all of which illustrate the commonality of marriage rather than the differences of dogma.

Introduction

It started in the kitchen. To be precise, it started on the brocade loveseat I had placed in the heart of our home. David thought I was bonkers, putting sitting room furniture in the kitchen, but it wasn’t long till its cozy magnetism lured him onto its cushions. You could stretch out in comfort right there in command central, close to sustenance. It was arguably the most popular spot in the house. Now I was curled up on it, sipping my tea while David chopped vegetables for his weekly batch of soup. The cadence of his knife stilled my mind much like a metronome, and into that space slipped an idea. “Hey,” I exclaimed. He turned to face me and I chuckled and said “I should write a book called I was Married to a Muslim, a Christian and a Jew.” My husband considered this for a moment and a half-smile registered on his face. I knew that look well. It was a look that supposed I had as much wherewithal to grow a prostate as to meet this unlikely goal. But he humored me and said “Why not?”


I haven’t grown a prostate but I have penned this account of my three marriages to men representing the world’s three major religions—Islam, Christianity and Judaism. It’s all true.


To protect the privacy of the people who shared their lives with me, names, occupations and places have been changed. While this creates a degree of inaccuracy, turning truth into fiction, the heart of the story remains uncompromisingly factual.

About the author

Liver of life, lover of words. This is my first and only book. view profile

Published on March 05, 2020

Published by

50000 words

Genre: Biographies & Memoirs

Reviewed by

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