Loved it! 😍

An entertaining journey for young and old kids, which offers an interesting spin on Greek mythology.

Synopsis

How did Jason defeat the dreaded farting Harpies? Was Hercules's hair really that great, really? Which members of Odysseus's crew were actually sheep? MASHED MYTHS: Greek Heroes is a fast paced, comical retelling of the classic stories loaded with laughs, drawings, quizzes and adventure! Aimed squarely at 7 to 12 year olds who like to laugh and giggle, Mashed Myths is Fractured Fairy Tales meets Homer in this hysterical collection of rollicking classic tales.

I thoroughly enjoyed this short humorist book which offers a hilarious new reading of the classical Greek myths. "Mashed Myths" is the perfect book for a child who's getting into the topic, as well as for any enthusiast who enjoys myths and legends and can appreciate a new side of them.


In recent years there has been a surge of retellings of famous fairytales and legends, but usually in the young adult genre. "Mashed Myths" is aimed at a much younger audience and it can be especially appealing to middle graders. I remember reading a similar series when I was around that age, "Horrible Histories", and it was my favourite thing at the time, only later overshadowed by the Harry Potter series.


I can make a parallel not only between the topic of "Horrible Histories" and "Mashed Myths", which is a child-friendly look into the otherwise more serious world of history and literature, but also, between the writing styles. "Mashed Myths" is going to win the hearts of young readers with a funny, every-day twist on the Greek mythology, with mythological heroes appearing on Yu-Gi-Oh style playing cards, with an engaging narrative and just the right amount of illustrations vs stories. "Mashed Myths" also offers quizzes, trivia and some gore, if made more or less appropriate for the kids.


Additionally, the book could easily be read by adults as well. I had a lot of fun exploring the author's creative approach, despite not only having read the real Greek myths, but also being much older than the target group.


What I think is the biggest plus of this book is the fact that the author knows how to write for kids. He seems to realize what will be interesting and funny to them, and also to make it educational and interactive. I believe that a person who didn't have the ability to connect to kids would be unable to sell this book, because it wouldn't reach the audience as it should.


One thing that kind of bothered me (where bothered might be too strong of a word), is that at certain points the book was a tad too close to the audience. There was too big an amount of fart and butt jokes, in my opinion, as well as entirely too many boogers. Yes, of course, kids would love it and find it hilarious, but all of it playing such a big role in the book, might send the wrong message, and create a wave of booger-eating, farting youngsters, because they might just think the heroes in the book can be accepted as role-models.

Reviewed by

I'm a passionate reader who devours all kinds of books and as many of them as possible. I like discovering new and different things, and also, reading books from authors from around the world.

Synopsis

How did Jason defeat the dreaded farting Harpies? Was Hercules's hair really that great, really? Which members of Odysseus's crew were actually sheep? MASHED MYTHS: Greek Heroes is a fast paced, comical retelling of the classic stories loaded with laughs, drawings, quizzes and adventure! Aimed squarely at 7 to 12 year olds who like to laugh and giggle, Mashed Myths is Fractured Fairy Tales meets Homer in this hysterical collection of rollicking classic tales.

Hercules & the Hydra

Hercules was a hero. One of the greatest ever. He was very strong, extremely brave, and had great hair. Like, seriously great. He could have been in a shampoo commercial, except he lived in Ancient Greece and they didn’t have TV back then. Or shampoo. But you get the idea.


Hercules had to serve the king of Tiryns. I won’t go into why because it’s pretty gruesome. (Hint: he kind of, sort of, accidentally killed a lot of people.) Before he was allowed to go free, the king gave Hercules twelve tasks to complete.


Now, twelve tasks doesn’t seem like that many. But the king was afraid of Hercules (see previous note about Hercules killing people). So instead of giving him jobs like walking the dog or cleaning the toilet, he gave Hercules twelve extremely dangerous jobs to do, like, crazy dangerous, hoping that Hercules would get killed doing them. (Though cleaning the toilet can be very dangerous, especially after your dad’s been in there.)


The king told herc to go kill the savage Nemean Lion. Not only did Hercules kill it, he wore it as a hat! (But only when he was having a bad hair day.)


The king was furious that Hercules had survived (and now had a cool hat), so he thought of an even more dangerous task: Kill the nine-headed Hydra monster that lived in the nearby Swamp of Lerna.


 “Righto,” said Hercules. “Piece of cake.”


“Yep,” said his nephew Iolaus, who was driving him to the swamp in his chariot. “Piece of cake. If by ‘cake’ you mean ‘enormous nine-headed, super-fast, super-strong snake with hundreds of razor-sharp teeth dripping with deadly poison.’ That sort of cake?”


“Very funny,” grumbled Hercules. “I wish you’d be a bit more positive.”


“I am positive,” said Iolaus as he pulled the chariot to a stop. “I am positive you are going to get eaten by the Hydra. Well, looks like we’re here”


They had stopped on the edge of a murky pond in the middle of the swamp. Bubbles of swamp gas glooped and popped on its surface. On the other side of the pond was a dark cave. Bones and gigantic snake scales lay scattered about the opening. A low hiss echoed from its black depths and the whole place stunk of rotting flesh and farts. Hercules stared nervously at the gloomy entrance to the Hydra’s lair.


“I’m not going in there!” he squeaked.


“What’s your plan then, hero?” said Iolaus. “Wait out here until it dies of old age?”


“No!” snapped Hercules. “I need to draw it out here, where I’ve got room

to fight.”


Hercules picked a booger from his nose and flicked it away. It landed on Iolaus.


“Ew! Gross! If you’re going to do that, I’m leaving.” huffed Iolaus.


“That’s it!” exclaimed Hercules. “I’ll shoot something down there to make it angry!”


“Boogers?” said Iolaus. “They might gross it out a bit,but —”


“Fire!” shouted Hercules. “I’ll shoot fire arrows down thehole! Snakes hate fire.”


“And lizards,” said Iolaus. “Cos lizards have legs, and the snakes

are jealous.”


But Hercules was no longer listening. He grabbed an arrow from his quiver and wrapped the head in cloth soaked with lamp oil. Lighting the arrow with his lantern, he stretched back the string on his mighty bow.


“Here goes nothing,” thought Hercules. ZHOOM! The flaming arrow streaked into the cave. The hissing suddenly stopped.


“Do you think it worked?” he said.


But Iolaus didn’t answer — the ground beneath them had begun to tremble. The hissing was replaced by a ROAR and the cave mouth shook and shivered as something… something HUGE thundered out of the darkness towards them.


“Yep,” gulped Iolaus. “I think it worked.”


END OF PART 1


About the author

MICK is an elementary school teacher who loves storytelling, playing guitar, and drawing funny pictures on the white board. He will happily abandon a maths lesson to get his class to write and act out stories. view profile

Published on March 26, 2019

Published by

10000 words

Worked with a Reedsy professional 🏆

Genre: Middle grade

Reviewed by

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