DiscoverThriller & Suspense

Forgive Me, Father...

By

Worth reading 😎

It's not easy to grab a reader in so few pages while still giving them the complete story, but O'Shea does it.

Synopsis

A church service ends.
A man sits in the back pew until everyone leaves.
He wants a confession from the priest.
A confession that could've been avoided.

Forgive Me, Father is a very quick read, taking less than fifteen minutes from start to finish. I think the actual page count is something like nine pages, but Tim O'Shea manages to pack a punch with that nine pages. Given the length of the story, I'll avoid details, since almost anything I say will give spoilers, but I will say that once the man in the back pew starts talking, it's easy to see where things are headed - kind of, and kind of not. Either way, it is a disturbing tale. That said, it surprised me to find a short story of only nine pages as a book on its own. I would've expected this one to be in a collection of several short stories, but it is what it is. This one does have an intriguing premise that I think could've made a gripping full-length novel, and I have to hand it to the author. It's not easy to grab a reader in so few pages while still giving them the complete story, but he does it. From what I've seen here, I would be interested to see what this author can do with a novel because he certainly shows talent for suspense. The story is well-written, and the flow and pacing are good. O'Shea does paint a good picture of the characters' surroundings with minimal space in the story, and it's easy to picture the man in the back pew from seeing him through the eyes of the priest, so again, the author clearly has talent. The only real drawback for me is the length of the story. Once I saw where it was going, I wanted to know more about the man in the back pew and what led him to that spot on that day. In the end, it is worth the read, and the length makes it perfect for a short break in the afternoon or a quick bedtime read.

Reviewed by

I am an avid reader, reviewer, and book blogger. I particularly enjoy romantic comedies, romantic suspense, and psychological thrillers but am not limited to those genres as my tastes in books run the gamut. My reviews are always completely honest. Love them or hate them, I call it as I read it.

Synopsis

A church service ends.
A man sits in the back pew until everyone leaves.
He wants a confession from the priest.
A confession that could've been avoided.

“Deuteronomy 31:6 tells us to be strong and courageous. Don’t be terrified because of them, for the Lord your god goes with you; he will never leave you nor forsake you.”

“Ahem,” came the chorus below his pulpit.

“In closing, I wish everyone to say a prayer to Martha McCally and her family. She is a constant presence in our church, volunteers graciously, and she is going through a serious illness at this time. Please think of her and her family during these trying times. Give a donation if you can. Let her know we are thinking of her every day.”

There were nodding of heads and reaching for purses and wallets.

Father Harrietha beamed as the church organ began playing and the service ended. He stepped down and started shaking hands and wishing people the best; prayers were extended both ways and twenty minutes later, Father Steven Harrietha waved goodbye to the last parishioner on the ancient stones steps of St. Michaels Catholic Church.

 

It was October and while it wasn’t bitterly cold, it sent people inside after ten minutes outside. He shut the door, the sound echoing inside the massive chapel; one which the ceiling towered above him at fifty feet. He started for his office in the back of the church when he noticed someone sitting in the furthest pew. A man, yes, but he seemed to be hiding himself. Bundled in jeans and a jacket, Father Harrietha approached. He tilted his head to get a better look at the man. White, hollow cheeks, scrubby beard. It wasn’t the first time he had seen someone struggling through the crisis of the opioid addiction that was spreading like hell fire through their small mid-western community.

Another soul that needed saving.

“Can I help you?” he asked.

 The man didn’t respond, still facing the front.

“Are you hungry?”

Again, no response.

“Do you need shelter?”

The man turned to him for the first time. This was a person who needed help no doubt. The man shook his head.

“No food. No shelter,” the man said.

“How can I help you?”

“I want to make a confession, Father.”

About the author

I am an author who currently lives in the Pacific Northwest with my fiancé, two dogs named Chewy and Bowser, and a cat named Big Foot. I have finished my first eBook, Cherry Street and the sequel to it, Head Count. And check out https://www.authortoshea.com/ for FREE short stories. view profile

Published on December 15, 2019

2000 words

Contains explicit content ⚠️

Genre: Thriller & Suspense

Reviewed by

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