DiscoverPoetry

Armageddon

By

Worth reading 😎

Realism and dystopia expressed in developing poetry. Strong in its message and potential

Synopsis

Isn’t it intriguing how the word “humanity” is describes virtue, and yet, human beings are notorious for ultimately destroying just about everything we touch? Exhibit A: Mother Earth. Exhibit B: Each other.There’s no denying it — human beings are curious creatures. For a species which perpetually glorifies goodness, we tend to do an awful lot of crooked things. Still, the question remains: are human beings plagued by evil, or are we actually the plague ourselves? Enter Armageddon. These poems tackle that truth no one really wants to swallow: good and evil are at war, and darkness is prevailing. Of course, both wickedness and righteousness shriek from the pages of Armageddon, but it’s fair to say that depravity runs dominant in this book. The dystopian poems in Armageddon exist to satisfy your soul's grimmest cravings, and feed it with the truth it seeks. This book is not for the faint of heart, but it is for John Milton, the creative and misunderstood genius who doesn't deserve to spend so much time turning in his grave, and for anyone who is sick of this inhumane world. More so, Armageddon’s for my misfits. Consider these poems medicine: something to soften your suffering.


Armageddon by Ami J. Sanghvi is the poet's third collection of published poetry. Sanghvi is a bit more than just a poet; she is a mixed martial arts fighter, a model, and a brand ambassador. On her web page, she says that she embraces the extremes: Indian and American, creator and destroyer. This seemed to be an intriguing mix.


Sanghvi opens this work with an introduction which explains the theme of the collection as well as some personal information on the poetry's development. Early on:


Every day, I step out into the world and find

myself greeted by manipulation, greed, ignorance,

and other terribly sinister things. The result is that I

have almost entirely lost my faith in mankind, and

this great thing we like to call “humanity” [for some

reason unbeknownst to me].


This is the build-up to the poetry of the real world. Poems titled "Consumerism", "United States of Affliction", "Trophy Wife", and "Burial" set the tone for the reader. The message is clear but the words seem somewhat forced. Her sonnet "Satan Devours Bones” is true to form, but the rhymes are simple and predictable. There is an abundance of talent in the writing but Sanghvi seems to be trapped by form or limiting herself with end rhymes that tend to be featureless. However, there is talent, as "Earth, Mankind, Heaven: Trifecta Synthesis" shows:


The brush sweeps through the dark, vivid dusk,

A striking sky of sea, wood, and rust;

Among clouds, where there is more wander than lust,

Men crave to touch glory before turning to dust.


Her appreciation and admiration of Milton show through in many poems, but it is where she breaks away from emulating Milton that her work begins to shine. The poem "Creed" is probably the best example of this collection. The poet cracks out of her mold and expresses herself in a unique and meaningful way. There is a great deal of potential in the poet's work and I expect very good things will come in future collections.

 

Reviewed by

Joseph Spuckler has a Masters Degree in International Relations and a deep appreciation for poetry and Modernist writers. He is a Marine Corps veteran and works as a mechanic devoting his off hours for motorcycling and reviewing poetry. Originally from Cleveland, he currently resides in Dallas.

Synopsis

Isn’t it intriguing how the word “humanity” is describes virtue, and yet, human beings are notorious for ultimately destroying just about everything we touch? Exhibit A: Mother Earth. Exhibit B: Each other.There’s no denying it — human beings are curious creatures. For a species which perpetually glorifies goodness, we tend to do an awful lot of crooked things. Still, the question remains: are human beings plagued by evil, or are we actually the plague ourselves? Enter Armageddon. These poems tackle that truth no one really wants to swallow: good and evil are at war, and darkness is prevailing. Of course, both wickedness and righteousness shriek from the pages of Armageddon, but it’s fair to say that depravity runs dominant in this book. The dystopian poems in Armageddon exist to satisfy your soul's grimmest cravings, and feed it with the truth it seeks. This book is not for the faint of heart, but it is for John Milton, the creative and misunderstood genius who doesn't deserve to spend so much time turning in his grave, and for anyone who is sick of this inhumane world. More so, Armageddon’s for my misfits. Consider these poems medicine: something to soften your suffering.

The United States of Affliction


Sand-soaked beaches,

Palm tree breezes,

Boundless reaches:

The American weakness.


A star-spangled banner,

Striped with blood and slander,

Born from gold-starved banter:

America’s stunning candor.


Blooming from the ashes,

Mighty men in sashes,

Children scarred by lashes:

Is America fascist?


They say we love cash/money,

Yankees are kinda funny,

California’s always sunny,

Our politicians are rather scummy.


The cultures we “borrow”,

A nation built on sorrow,

Americans desperate

For a brighter tomorrow.


About the author

Ami J. Sanghvi is a Desi-American, queer writer, photographer, mixed martial artist, and M.F.A. candidate. She's the author of Amaranthine, Devolution, Armageddon, and Silk & Cigars. Her work has appeared in Awakenings (The Nightingale), and is scheduled to appear in The Showbear Family Circus, etc. view profile

Published on April 03, 2019

Published by

7000 words

Contains explicit content ⚠️

Genre: Poetry

Reviewed by

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