Nick Toadvine

Nick Toadvine

Lakeland, FL, United States

Nick Toadvine is a dedicated financial advisor who loves to research exciting technology topics as well as spend time with his loving family

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About the author

Nick Toadvine has worked in the finance industry for more than 20 years. He specializes in a number of areas including investment management, risk management, and retirement income.

In 2003 Nick founded his own company, Guardian Wealth Management. Nick loves to work through the difficult situations that come along with provided financial services to his clients. Establishing long-lasting relationships and positive results are two of his favorite aspects of the job.

Nick Toadvine has enjoyed observing technology become part of the industry and looks forward to seeing it continue to transform the way we do business and make it more efficient. Staying on top of the current trends is crucial to success, so Nick makes a point to remain educated on new policies, services, and tools.

Aside from running his own company, Nick Toadvine has also formerly hosted a weekly financial talk radio show, Your Money Counts, on Saturday mornings in his hometown of the Polk County area. When he’s not offering investment or financial advice, he is likely enjoying time with his family, trying out a new seafood restaurant, or exercising.

Nick frequently visits the gym to keep his health and overall wellness in check. On top of servcing his clients in the financial industry, Nick has a passion for health and learning about the best practices that serve his goals.
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Latest blog posts from Wordpress - Nick Toadvine

Why We’re Using More Energy

Contrary to what we hear about conservative practices with energy consumption, energy use in American homes has actually increased over the past 30 years. Data compiled by the U.S. Energy Department identified various reasons as to why we’re using more energy, primarily electricity.


Data from the Energy Department revealed a sharp rise in electricity usage for households in 2018, elevating to the highest levels ever. Households purchase electricity from utility companies in measurements known as megawatt hours. A megawatt is equivalent to one million watts, which is approximately the same energy produced by 10 automobile engines. At 1,463,533,000 megawatts for 2018, that amounts to an enormous amount of energy usage.


Energy-Chart - Nick Toadvine.png


The use of more energy has been originating from homes all over the country, driving up usage and even straining grid capacities at certain times of the year. The culprit to elevated electricity consumption is the plethora of smaller electronic devices that have encroached upon American homes over the past few years.


As technological advancements have created more electronic devices, and at affordable prices, the increased use of plug in outlets and power strips has also increased. The Energy Department estimates that energy used in households for appliances and electronic devices accounted for about 21% of total household consumption throughout the 1980s. It now estimates that over 35% of total consumption is appliance and electronic device driven.


Over the years a multitude of regulations and laws have been enacted to curtail the use of electricity by larger and widely used appliances such as refrigerators and washing machines. The challenge has been the ongoing proliferation of smaller electronic devices and the difficulty to identify and regulate them.


Bigger homes have become more of the norm since the late 90s, where homes built in the 1970s and 1980s were typically less than 1800 sq ft. In the 1990s the average size of a new home increased to 2200 sq ft and rose to 2400 sq ft in the 2000s. Even though homes built in the 90s and 2000s contain more energy efficient technology, the larger area and higher ceilings consume more energy to heat and cool, outweighing some of the technology benefits.

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Apr 24, 2019 19:46